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This area allows you to search for and learn about artifacts published by the Sardis Expedition. Currently (2020) the database consists of artifacts in the exhibition and catalog “The Lydians and Their World” (Yapı Kredi Vedat Nedim Tör Museum, Istanbul, 2010) and Jane Evans, Coins from the Excavations at Sardis: Their Archaeological and Economic Contexts. Coins from the 1973 to 2013 Excavations. In coming years we intend to add objects from other Sardis Reports and Monographs.

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Select an object type from the list below. Certain object types (including architectural terracottas, coins, pottery, sculpture) include subtypes (shape and ware of pottery, denomination and mint of coins) to refine your search.

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Select the language of inscribed texts from the list below.

Refine Metalwork

Refine Pottery

Refine Sculpture

Refine Architectural Terracotta

Select a material from the list below.

Select a museum from the list below.

Select a Sardis CATNUM from the list below. CATNUM is made up from object type, year, and sequential number. BI = Bone Implement; G = Glass; J = Jewelry; L = Lamp; M = Metal; NoEx = not excavated; Org = Organic; P = Pottery; S = Sculpture. Coins are numbered with the year of discovery and a running number, or year, C, and a running number. Currently (Feb. 2020) this doesn't give a complete list, only the first 99 entries; to find a specific CATNUM, please use the full-text search at the top of the page.

Select a historical period from the (alphabetical) list below. Note that periods are defined culturally rather than politically, so Lydian (rather than Archaic) refers to the period ca. 800 BC - ca. 547 BC; Late Lydian or Persian (rather than Late Archaic or Classical) from ca. 547 until ca. 330 BC; Hellenistic until the earthquake of 17 AD; Roman and Late Roman continue until the early 7th century AD, except for coins where, as traditional, Prof. Evans begins the Byzantine period in the 6th century.

Select a publication name from the list below. LATW = Lydians and Their World (2010). R2 = Hanfmann and Ramage, Sculpture from Sardis (1978). M10 = Schaeffer, Ramage, and Greenewalt, The Corinthian, Attic, and Pottery from Sardis (1997). M13 = Evans, Coins from the Excavations at Sardis, 1973-2013 (2018). M14 = Petzl, Sardis: Greek and Latin Inscriptions, Part II (2019).

Select a site from the list below.

The stratigraphic contexts (findspots) of artifacts from Sardis are recorded at different levels of specificity. Sector is the most general, referring to a broad area of the city. Trenches are yearly excavation areas (in current usage) or more specific areas of sectors (in early records which used a different excavation system). A Locus is a single stratigraphic unit, i.e. a single deposit of soil, a destruction level, a grave, a dump or other deposit. For instance, MMS-I 84.1 Locus 34 is the destruction level from one room of a Lydian house just inside the fortification wall in sector MMS, containing a rich deposit of Lydian pottery and other artifacts. Note that loci can be continued over a number of years, and so belong to different trenches, if the same stratigraphic unit is excavated over a number of years. For a list of sectors see Hanfmann and Waldbaum, A Survey of Sardis and the Major Monuments Outside the City Walls (Sardis R1, 1975), 13-16. Currently (2020) in order to search for a specific locus, you must search for Trench first to narrow the results, and then search within that for the locus. Sorry.

The stratigraphic contexts (findspots) of artifacts from Sardis are recorded at different levels of specificity. Sector is the most general, referring to a broad area of the city. Trenches are yearly excavation areas (in current usage) or more specific areas of sectors (in early records which used a different excavation system). A Locus is a single stratigraphic unit, i.e. a single deposit of soil, a destruction level, a grave, a dump or other deposit. For instance, MMS-I 84.1 Locus 34 is the destruction level from one room of a Lydian house just inside the fortification wall in sector MMS, containing a rich deposit of Lydian pottery and other artifacts. Note that loci can be continued over a number of years, and so belong to different trenches, if the same stratigraphic unit is excavated over a number of years. For a list of sectors see Hanfmann and Waldbaum, A Survey of Sardis and the Major Monuments Outside the City Walls (Sardis R1, 1975), 13-16. Currently (2020) in order to search for a specific locus, you must search for Trench first to narrow the results, and then search within that for the locus. Sorry.

The stratigraphic contexts (findspots) of artifacts from Sardis are recorded at different levels of specificity. Sector is the most general, referring to a broad area of the city. Trenches are yearly excavation areas (in current usage) or more specific areas of sectors (in early records which used a different excavation system). A Locus is a single stratigraphic unit, i.e. a single deposit of soil, a destruction level, a grave, a dump or other deposit. For instance, MMS-I 84.1 Locus 34 is the destruction level from one room of a Lydian house just inside the fortification wall in sector MMS, containing a rich deposit of Lydian pottery and other artifacts. Note that loci can be continued over a number of years, and so belong to different trenches, if the same stratigraphic unit is excavated over a number of years. For a list of sectors see Hanfmann and Waldbaum, A Survey of Sardis and the Major Monuments Outside the City Walls (Sardis R1, 1975), 13-16. Currently (2020) in order to search for a specific locus, you must search for Trench first to narrow the results, and then search within that for the locus. Sorry.

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  • Stele of Menophila
    Stele of Menophila

    R2 Cat. 245

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    2nd or 1st C. BC (Hellenistic)

    The pediment has three acroteria: the central one has two snakes pointing downwards; the other two each have one snake pointing upwards. The recessed niche has tapering sides parallel to the stele sides. The relief shows a woman standing in a Pudicit...

  • Statue of Moschine, Priestess of Artemis
    Statue of Moschine, Priestess of Artemis

    R2 Cat. 246

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    50-25 BC (Hellenistic)

    The priestess stands twisted slightly to her l., her r. foot drawn back and resting on the toes. She wears a chiton, himation, and platformed sandals, and stands on a square inscribed base.

    The himation is drawn from her r. to her l. side across her b...

  • Winged Eros
    Winged Eros

    R2 Cat. 247

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    Late 3rd C. BC (Hellenistic)

    The nude, winged Eros, just older than a baby, stands with the weight on his r. leg, his head turned slightly to proper l. His r. arm is bent at the elbow and across the body. A small fragment of an arrow is held in his r. hand. The l. hand probably ...

  • Triple Head of Hekate
    Triple Head of Hekate

    R2 Cat. 248

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    Roman? (Roman?)

    The central head of the Hekateion has circular locks and a floral crown. The two lateral heads have ribbons in their hair which is parted in the center and falls in long locks on their shoulders. They wear turreted crowns. There are incised lines on ...

  • Double-Sided Herm with Kouros Figure on One Side and Herm on the Other
    Double-Sided Herm with Kouros Figure on One Side and Herm on the Other

    R2 Cat. 249

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    1st or 2nd C. AD (Roman)

    The kouros, treated as a frontal relief, stands with both feet together and both arms down the sides. A strand of hair remains on his r. shoulder. The neck, chest, and abdomen are outlined in a sharp, linear fashion. The pubic hair is somewhat styliz...

  • Head of Augustus
    Head of Augustus

    R2 Cat. 250

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    1st half of 1st C. AD (Roman)

    The idealized head of Augustus is turned slightly to his I. The sharp lines for eyebrows are prominent; the large eyes have no markings for pupil or iris. The nose is sharp and pointed, the mouth small. The face is attractive, but remarkably lacking ...

  • Head of the Elder Faustina
    Head of the Elder Faustina

    R2 Cat. 251

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    Ca. 140 AD (Roman)

    The following description is after İnan-Rosenbaum: The back of the head is hollow and has a large dowel hole in the center flanked by two oblong dowel holes. Two other dowel holes at ear lobe level are broken away. There are drill channels in the hai...

  • Colossal Female Head, Artemis?
    Colossal Female Head, Artemis?

    R2 Cat. 252

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    Ca. 140 AD? (Antonine) (Roman)

    The following description is taken from Sardis I, 147: "A colossal sculptured face, very well preserved . . . differs entirely from the similar heads found here; for, though in high relief, it was almost certainly never part of an entire head, but wa...

  • Horseman Riding toward Altar
    Horseman Riding toward Altar

    R2 Cat. 253

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    (Hellenistic)

    The horseman, according to Buckler and Robinson, has a crescent behind his shoulders and therefore represents Mên (ibid.). He wears a short belted tunic with a few minimal diagonal folds. In his r. hand he may hold a short stick. The beginning of the...

  • Head of a Woman
    Head of a Woman

    R2 Cat. 254

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    AD 218-235 (Roman)

    The portrait was worked for insertion into a statue body. The head is turned slightly to the l., and the woman looks upwards, as indicated by the drilled bean-shaped pupils which are placed high within the incised irises. The surfaces of the eyes are...

  • Bust of Elpidike
    Bust of Elpidike

    R2 Cat. 255

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    3rd C. AD (Roman)

    The bust of a woman is framed by an arched niche with a pilaster on each side, with simple capital and base. The head is turned slightly to the l. Her hair is parted in the middle and drawn behind her ears, where it falls in heavy locks. The drapery,...

  • Enthroned Mother of the Gods (Cybele)
    Enthroned Mother of the Gods (Cybele)

    R2 Cat. 256

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    2nd or 3rd C. AD (Roman)

    Cybele is enthroned and seated between two lions. The arched recess in which she sits suggests a shrine. She wears a high-girt chiton with a V-neck. The transparent cloth reveals her navel and the shape of her breasts. A heavier cloth himation is dra...