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This area allows you to search for and learn about artifacts published by the Sardis Expedition. Currently (2020) the database consists of artifacts in the exhibition and catalog “The Lydians and Their World” (Yapı Kredi Vedat Nedim Tör Museum, Istanbul, 2010) and Jane Evans, Coins from the Excavations at Sardis: Their Archaeological and Economic Contexts. Coins from the 1973 to 2013 Excavations. In coming years we intend to add objects from other Sardis Reports and Monographs.

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Select an object type from the list below. Certain object types (including architectural terracottas, coins, pottery, sculpture) include subtypes (shape and ware of pottery, denomination and mint of coins) to refine your search.

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Select the language of inscribed texts from the list below.

Refine Metalwork

Refine Pottery

Refine Sculpture

Refine Architectural Terracotta

Select a material from the list below.

Select a museum from the list below.

Select a Sardis CATNUM from the list below. CATNUM is made up from object type, year, and sequential number. BI = Bone Implement; G = Glass; J = Jewelry; L = Lamp; M = Metal; NoEx = not excavated; Org = Organic; P = Pottery; S = Sculpture. Coins are numbered with the year of discovery and a running number, or year, C, and a running number. Currently (Feb. 2020) this doesn't give a complete list, only the first 99 entries; to find a specific CATNUM, please use the full-text search at the top of the page.

Select a historical period from the (alphabetical) list below. Note that periods are defined culturally rather than politically, so Lydian (rather than Archaic) refers to the period ca. 800 BC - ca. 547 BC; Late Lydian or Persian (rather than Late Archaic or Classical) from ca. 547 until ca. 330 BC; Hellenistic until the earthquake of 17 AD; Roman and Late Roman continue until the early 7th century AD, except for coins where, as traditional, Prof. Evans begins the Byzantine period in the 6th century.

Select a publication name from the list below. LATW = Lydians and Their World (2010). R2 = Hanfmann and Ramage, Sculpture from Sardis (1978). M10 = Schaeffer, Ramage, and Greenewalt, The Corinthian, Attic, and Pottery from Sardis (1997). M13 = Evans, Coins from the Excavations at Sardis, 1973-2013 (2018). M14 = Petzl, Sardis: Greek and Latin Inscriptions, Part II (2019).

Select a site from the list below.

The stratigraphic contexts (findspots) of artifacts from Sardis are recorded at different levels of specificity. Sector is the most general, referring to a broad area of the city. Trenches are yearly excavation areas (in current usage) or more specific areas of sectors (in early records which used a different excavation system). A Locus is a single stratigraphic unit, i.e. a single deposit of soil, a destruction level, a grave, a dump or other deposit. For instance, MMS-I 84.1 Locus 34 is the destruction level from one room of a Lydian house just inside the fortification wall in sector MMS, containing a rich deposit of Lydian pottery and other artifacts. Note that loci can be continued over a number of years, and so belong to different trenches, if the same stratigraphic unit is excavated over a number of years. For a list of sectors see Hanfmann and Waldbaum, A Survey of Sardis and the Major Monuments Outside the City Walls (Sardis R1, 1975), 13-16. Currently (2020) in order to search for a specific locus, you must search for Trench first to narrow the results, and then search within that for the locus. Sorry.

The stratigraphic contexts (findspots) of artifacts from Sardis are recorded at different levels of specificity. Sector is the most general, referring to a broad area of the city. Trenches are yearly excavation areas (in current usage) or more specific areas of sectors (in early records which used a different excavation system). A Locus is a single stratigraphic unit, i.e. a single deposit of soil, a destruction level, a grave, a dump or other deposit. For instance, MMS-I 84.1 Locus 34 is the destruction level from one room of a Lydian house just inside the fortification wall in sector MMS, containing a rich deposit of Lydian pottery and other artifacts. Note that loci can be continued over a number of years, and so belong to different trenches, if the same stratigraphic unit is excavated over a number of years. For a list of sectors see Hanfmann and Waldbaum, A Survey of Sardis and the Major Monuments Outside the City Walls (Sardis R1, 1975), 13-16. Currently (2020) in order to search for a specific locus, you must search for Trench first to narrow the results, and then search within that for the locus. Sorry.

The stratigraphic contexts (findspots) of artifacts from Sardis are recorded at different levels of specificity. Sector is the most general, referring to a broad area of the city. Trenches are yearly excavation areas (in current usage) or more specific areas of sectors (in early records which used a different excavation system). A Locus is a single stratigraphic unit, i.e. a single deposit of soil, a destruction level, a grave, a dump or other deposit. For instance, MMS-I 84.1 Locus 34 is the destruction level from one room of a Lydian house just inside the fortification wall in sector MMS, containing a rich deposit of Lydian pottery and other artifacts. Note that loci can be continued over a number of years, and so belong to different trenches, if the same stratigraphic unit is excavated over a number of years. For a list of sectors see Hanfmann and Waldbaum, A Survey of Sardis and the Major Monuments Outside the City Walls (Sardis R1, 1975), 13-16. Currently (2020) in order to search for a specific locus, you must search for Trench first to narrow the results, and then search within that for the locus. Sorry.

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  • The "Borgia Stele"
    The "Borgia Stele"

    R2 Cat. 269

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    ca. 480-470 BC ()

    The controversy over the "Borgia stele" is reviewed with bibliography by Friis-Johansen (Attic Grave-Reliefs, 125, n. 2) who notes that the provenance is not known with certainty. Finati (Supposto Ulisse, 3f., text, pl. 10) states that according to a...

  • Honorary Stele with Horseman
    Honorary Stele with Horseman

    R2 Cat. 270

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    Late Hellenistic or very early Roman Imperial (Hellenistic or Roman)

    A horseman is shown riding to r. and approaching a round altar and tree. He wears a short tunic and a cloak attached with a brooch. His face is too damaged to determine whether or not he was bearded. A snake drinks from a patera (?) on the altar. A w...

  • Hermes-like Statuette Dedicated to Hosion Kai Dikaion
    Hermes-like Statuette Dedicated to Hosion Kai Dikaion

    R2 Cat. 271

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    2nd or 3rd C. AD (Roman)

    The figure wears a girt tunic with a chlamys fastened over the r. shoulder and falling down to his feet in back. There is a circular pillar at the l. leg. He holds a caduceus with the lowered l. hand. On the front of the base there is a Greek inscrip...

  • Marble Block with Inscription in Unknown Language
    Marble Block with Inscription in Unknown Language

    R2 Cat. 272

    Sculpture, Inscription

    Marble, Stone

    5th-4th C. BC? (Late Lydian (Persian))

    "There is no evidence for any covering of the inscription; no remnants of stucco nor mortar revetment backing nor revetment pin holes were observed anywhere on the piers. On the evidence, the inscription was visible when reused" (A.R. Seager, by lett...

  • Dedication of an Image of Zeus Baradates
    Dedication of an Image of Zeus Baradates

    R2 Cat. 273

    Sculpture, Statue Base, Inscription

    Marble, Stone

    Original date 367-366 BC, 39th year of Artaxerxes II Mnemon. (Late Lydian (Persian))

    The original base of the statue is lost. Its inscription, a dedication by the satrap Droaphernes, was copied in Roman times together with other texts. The inscription is published with commentary by L. Robert. I believe with C.H. Greenewalt, Jr. (Sev...

  • Bilingual dedication of Nannas Bakivalis to Artemis
    Bilingual dedication of Nannas Bakivalis to Artemis

    R2 Cat. 274

    Sculpture, Statue Base, Inscription

    Marble, Stone

    (Late Lydian (Persian))

    The top is very roughly trimmed with large point and is clearly not the original surface which probably was smooth. The rather deeply cut holes for two feet seem to be for a human statue (left cutting: L. 0.155; D. 0.045; right cutting: L. 0.14; D. u...

  • Base for statue of Hera, set up by Socrates Pardalas and restored by Julia Lydia
    Base for statue of Hera, set up by Socrates Pardalas and restored by Julia Lydia

    R2 Cat. 275

    Sculpture, Statue Base, Inscription

    Marble, Stone

    20-30 AD (Roman)

    The preserved top of the plinth has fine pointed chisel work; the interior of the cutting for the statue base is rough chiseled. The profile shows a simple molding at top and bottom, with a drafted band below the top molding.

    Socrates son of Polemaio...

  • Base for Statue of Lucius Verus
    Base for Statue of Lucius Verus

    R2 Cat. 276

    Sculpture, Statue Base, Inscription

    Marble, Stone

    166 AD (Roman)

    The top of the plinth has a cutting, off center, for a statue. The inscription face is slightly concave.

    The inscription and statue probably were set up to honor the Emperor on his visit to Sardis in A.D. 166.

  • Base for Images of the Children of Kore
    Base for Images of the Children of Kore

    R2 Cat. 277

    Sculpture, Statue Base, Inscription

    Marble, Stone

    211-212 AD (Roman)

    The two blocks have a simple flaring molding at the bottom and rest upon a larger profiled base, which is also made of two blocks.

  • Base for Fountain with Gilded Bronze Serpents
    Base for Fountain with Gilded Bronze Serpents

    R2 Cat. 278

    Sculpture, Statue Base, Inscription

    Marble, Stone

    4th-6th C. AD (Roman)

    The base has a molded profile at top and bottom. A vertical channel is cut in one side for a water pipe.

    Letter forms suggest a late date, 4th-6th C. A.D.