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This area allows you to search for and learn about artifacts published by the Sardis Expedition. Currently (2020) the database consists of artifacts in the exhibition and catalog “The Lydians and Their World” (Yapı Kredi Vedat Nedim Tör Museum, Istanbul, 2010) and Jane Evans, Coins from the Excavations at Sardis: Their Archaeological and Economic Contexts. Coins from the 1973 to 2013 Excavations. In coming years we intend to add objects from other Sardis Reports and Monographs.

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Select an object type from the list below. Certain object types (including architectural terracottas, coins, pottery, sculpture) include subtypes (shape and ware of pottery, denomination and mint of coins) to refine your search.

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Select the language of inscribed texts from the list below.

Refine Metalwork

Refine Pottery

Refine Sculpture

Refine Architectural Terracotta

Select a material from the list below.

Select a museum from the list below.

Select a Sardis CATNUM from the list below. CATNUM is made up from object type, year, and sequential number. BI = Bone Implement; G = Glass; J = Jewelry; L = Lamp; M = Metal; NoEx = not excavated; Org = Organic; P = Pottery; S = Sculpture. Coins are numbered with the year of discovery and a running number, or year, C, and a running number. Currently (Feb. 2020) this doesn't give a complete list, only the first 99 entries; to find a specific CATNUM, please use the full-text search at the top of the page.

Select a historical period from the (alphabetical) list below. Note that periods are defined culturally rather than politically, so Lydian (rather than Archaic) refers to the period ca. 800 BC - ca. 547 BC; Late Lydian or Persian (rather than Late Archaic or Classical) from ca. 547 until ca. 330 BC; Hellenistic until the earthquake of 17 AD; Roman and Late Roman continue until the early 7th century AD, except for coins where, as traditional, Prof. Evans begins the Byzantine period in the 6th century.

Select a publication name from the list below. LATW = Lydians and Their World (2010). R2 = Hanfmann and Ramage, Sculpture from Sardis (1978). M10 = Schaeffer, Ramage, and Greenewalt, The Corinthian, Attic, and Pottery from Sardis (1997). M13 = Evans, Coins from the Excavations at Sardis, 1973-2013 (2018). M14 = Petzl, Sardis: Greek and Latin Inscriptions, Part II (2019).

Select a site from the list below.

The stratigraphic contexts (findspots) of artifacts from Sardis are recorded at different levels of specificity. Sector is the most general, referring to a broad area of the city. Trenches are yearly excavation areas (in current usage) or more specific areas of sectors (in early records which used a different excavation system). A Locus is a single stratigraphic unit, i.e. a single deposit of soil, a destruction level, a grave, a dump or other deposit. For instance, MMS-I 84.1 Locus 34 is the destruction level from one room of a Lydian house just inside the fortification wall in sector MMS, containing a rich deposit of Lydian pottery and other artifacts. Note that loci can be continued over a number of years, and so belong to different trenches, if the same stratigraphic unit is excavated over a number of years. For a list of sectors see Hanfmann and Waldbaum, A Survey of Sardis and the Major Monuments Outside the City Walls (Sardis R1, 1975), 13-16. Currently (2020) in order to search for a specific locus, you must search for Trench first to narrow the results, and then search within that for the locus. Sorry.

The stratigraphic contexts (findspots) of artifacts from Sardis are recorded at different levels of specificity. Sector is the most general, referring to a broad area of the city. Trenches are yearly excavation areas (in current usage) or more specific areas of sectors (in early records which used a different excavation system). A Locus is a single stratigraphic unit, i.e. a single deposit of soil, a destruction level, a grave, a dump or other deposit. For instance, MMS-I 84.1 Locus 34 is the destruction level from one room of a Lydian house just inside the fortification wall in sector MMS, containing a rich deposit of Lydian pottery and other artifacts. Note that loci can be continued over a number of years, and so belong to different trenches, if the same stratigraphic unit is excavated over a number of years. For a list of sectors see Hanfmann and Waldbaum, A Survey of Sardis and the Major Monuments Outside the City Walls (Sardis R1, 1975), 13-16. Currently (2020) in order to search for a specific locus, you must search for Trench first to narrow the results, and then search within that for the locus. Sorry.

The stratigraphic contexts (findspots) of artifacts from Sardis are recorded at different levels of specificity. Sector is the most general, referring to a broad area of the city. Trenches are yearly excavation areas (in current usage) or more specific areas of sectors (in early records which used a different excavation system). A Locus is a single stratigraphic unit, i.e. a single deposit of soil, a destruction level, a grave, a dump or other deposit. For instance, MMS-I 84.1 Locus 34 is the destruction level from one room of a Lydian house just inside the fortification wall in sector MMS, containing a rich deposit of Lydian pottery and other artifacts. Note that loci can be continued over a number of years, and so belong to different trenches, if the same stratigraphic unit is excavated over a number of years. For a list of sectors see Hanfmann and Waldbaum, A Survey of Sardis and the Major Monuments Outside the City Walls (Sardis R1, 1975), 13-16. Currently (2020) in order to search for a specific locus, you must search for Trench first to narrow the results, and then search within that for the locus. Sorry.

Showing 9706 results for:  
  • Funerary Stele of Atrastas, son of Timles
    Funerary Stele of Atrastas, son of Timles

    R2 Cat. 234

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    330-329 BC (Hellenistic)

    C. H. Greenewalt, Jr. noted that at the top, the relief molding has painted egg and dart motif, yellow with black background. There are five lines of text in Lydian, with red preserved in some letters. Below the text is a sculptured scene showing a m...

  • Relief with Funerary Meal
    Relief with Funerary Meal

    R2 Cat. 234bis

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    300 BC (Hellenistic)

    The bearded man lies on a couch with a drinking cup in his I. hand. A snake coils over his l. shoulder and his veiled wife sits at his feet. Before him stands a three-legged table, beside it a wine jar and a small boy who is serving the wine. On the ...

  • Lion Sejant From Nannas Monument
    Lion Sejant From Nannas Monument

    R2 Cat. 235

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    ca. 500 BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    The lion is seated in a frontal position. The tail loops under the hindquarters and over the left haunch. The mane has long wavy locks ending slightly down the back, less deeply cut than Synagogue lions (Cat. 25 Figs. 92-101). The style is archaic. R...

  • Recumbent Lion From Nannas Monument
    Recumbent Lion From Nannas Monument

    R2 Cat. 236

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    550-540 BC (Lydian or Late Lydian)

    On a plinth with forepaws extended in front, the lion has its head turned to the l. with the mouth wide open and tongue protruding. The eyes are hollow for inlay, the ears fairly close to the head. The mane is arranged in leaf-like locks, many ending...

  • Lion Spout Attached to Rectangular Member
    Lion Spout Attached to Rectangular Member

    R2 Cat. 237

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    (Lydian?)

    "This [colossal lion's head] in all probability belonged to the cornice of the temple and when in place, stood in a position almost directly above the spot where it was found, being the water-spout nearest the corner of the temple. The scale of the h...

  • Bird of Prey (Eagle?) Holding a Hare, from the Nannas monument
    Bird of Prey (Eagle?) Holding a Hare, from the Nannas monument

    R2 Cat. 238

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    Late archaic? (Lydian?)

    A sitting bird of prey is holding with slightly bent talons a long-eared creature -- hare or rabbit. The wings are folded on the back; they have three tiers of long feathers, while the front part is stylized in small vertical ovals. The chest feather...

  • Sphinx, presumably part of a throne or seat
    Sphinx, presumably part of a throne or seat

    R2 Cat. 239

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    480-450 BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    The seated sphinx is partly in the round, partly in relief. A rectangular slab has been worked so that the forelegs and frontal lower part of the body stand free. Behind the head (now lost) and upper part of the body the background was retained and w...

  • Part of Sepulchral Stele with Palmette
    Part of Sepulchral Stele with Palmette

    R2 Cat. 240

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    ca. 420-400 BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    The stele has an oval finial, seven-petalled palmette on antithetic horizontal spirals, and downward-pointed small lotus. The anthemion projects slightly to the spectator's r. "The lateral projection ... was probably next to the dromos, whereas the s...

  • Anthemion with Lydian-Aramaic Bilingual Inscription, Stele of Manes, Son of Kumlis
    Anthemion with Lydian-Aramaic Bilingual Inscription, Stele of Manes, Son of Kumlis

    R2 Cat. 241

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    394 BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    Two vertical half-volutes grow out of small acanthus chalices to support a seven-leaf simple palmette. Two small flowers (or ears of corn?) flank the central petal. Three large downward-pointed chalices are in the center below the palmette. Below the...

  • Stele of Alikres, Son of Karos
    Stele of Alikres, Son of Karos

    R2 Cat. 242

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    Early 4th C. BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    Funerary stele with Lydian inscription and rounded palmette anthemion, stele of Alikres, son of Karos.Grayish "local" marble. Much reddish incrustation on face.

    Piece of marble broken off at top. According to Buckler (Sardis VI, 2, 49) bottom is origi...

  • Sarcophagus of Claudia Antonia Sabina
    Sarcophagus of Claudia Antonia Sabina

    R2 Cat. 243

    Sculpture, Sarcophagus

    Marble, Stone

    2nd or early 3rd C. AD (Roman)

    For full description and discussion, see Sardis V, 3ff.; Mansel, Erwerbungsbericht, 176, fig. 6; Ferrari, Commercio Sarcofagi, 39; Lawrence, Additional Sarcophagi, 116ff.; Wiegartz, Säulensarkophage, 158 (Istanbul G) and further bibliography therein....

  • Sarcophagus Fragment
    Sarcophagus Fragment

    R2 Cat. 244

    Sculpture, Sarcophagus

    Marble, Stone

    Ca. 170-180 AD (Roman)

    The corner fragment comprises "the cornice of the left intercolumniation of a lateral face, and the left extremity of the adjacent raking cornice" (Sardis V, 39). The interior border is raised to hold the lid. The acroteria consist of a headless anim...