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This area allows you to search for and learn about artifacts published by the Sardis Expedition. Currently (2020) the database consists of artifacts in the exhibition and catalog “The Lydians and Their World” (Yapı Kredi Vedat Nedim Tör Museum, Istanbul, 2010) and Jane Evans, Coins from the Excavations at Sardis: Their Archaeological and Economic Contexts. Coins from the 1973 to 2013 Excavations. In coming years we intend to add objects from other Sardis Reports and Monographs.

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Select an object type from the list below. Certain object types (including architectural terracottas, coins, pottery, sculpture) include subtypes (shape and ware of pottery, denomination and mint of coins) to refine your search.

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Refine Inscription

Select the language of inscribed texts from the list below.

Refine Metalwork

Refine Pottery

Refine Sculpture

Refine Architectural Terracotta

Select a material from the list below.

Select a museum from the list below.

Select a Sardis CATNUM from the list below. CATNUM is made up from object type, year, and sequential number. BI = Bone Implement; G = Glass; J = Jewelry; L = Lamp; M = Metal; NoEx = not excavated; Org = Organic; P = Pottery; S = Sculpture. Coins are numbered with the year of discovery and a running number, or year, C, and a running number. Currently (Feb. 2020) this doesn't give a complete list, only the first 99 entries; to find a specific CATNUM, please use the full-text search at the top of the page.

Select a historical period from the (alphabetical) list below. Note that periods are defined culturally rather than politically, so Lydian (rather than Archaic) refers to the period ca. 800 BC - ca. 547 BC; Late Lydian or Persian (rather than Late Archaic or Classical) from ca. 547 until ca. 330 BC; Hellenistic until the earthquake of 17 AD; Roman and Late Roman continue until the early 7th century AD, except for coins where, as traditional, Prof. Evans begins the Byzantine period in the 6th century.

Select a publication name from the list below. LATW = Lydians and Their World (2010). R2 = Hanfmann and Ramage, Sculpture from Sardis (1978). M10 = Schaeffer, Ramage, and Greenewalt, The Corinthian, Attic, and Pottery from Sardis (1997). M13 = Evans, Coins from the Excavations at Sardis, 1973-2013 (2018). M14 = Petzl, Sardis: Greek and Latin Inscriptions, Part II (2019).

Select a site from the list below.

The stratigraphic contexts (findspots) of artifacts from Sardis are recorded at different levels of specificity. Sector is the most general, referring to a broad area of the city. Trenches are yearly excavation areas (in current usage) or more specific areas of sectors (in early records which used a different excavation system). A Locus is a single stratigraphic unit, i.e. a single deposit of soil, a destruction level, a grave, a dump or other deposit. For instance, MMS-I 84.1 Locus 34 is the destruction level from one room of a Lydian house just inside the fortification wall in sector MMS, containing a rich deposit of Lydian pottery and other artifacts. Note that loci can be continued over a number of years, and so belong to different trenches, if the same stratigraphic unit is excavated over a number of years. For a list of sectors see Hanfmann and Waldbaum, A Survey of Sardis and the Major Monuments Outside the City Walls (Sardis R1, 1975), 13-16. Currently (2020) in order to search for a specific locus, you must search for Trench first to narrow the results, and then search within that for the locus. Sorry.

The stratigraphic contexts (findspots) of artifacts from Sardis are recorded at different levels of specificity. Sector is the most general, referring to a broad area of the city. Trenches are yearly excavation areas (in current usage) or more specific areas of sectors (in early records which used a different excavation system). A Locus is a single stratigraphic unit, i.e. a single deposit of soil, a destruction level, a grave, a dump or other deposit. For instance, MMS-I 84.1 Locus 34 is the destruction level from one room of a Lydian house just inside the fortification wall in sector MMS, containing a rich deposit of Lydian pottery and other artifacts. Note that loci can be continued over a number of years, and so belong to different trenches, if the same stratigraphic unit is excavated over a number of years. For a list of sectors see Hanfmann and Waldbaum, A Survey of Sardis and the Major Monuments Outside the City Walls (Sardis R1, 1975), 13-16. Currently (2020) in order to search for a specific locus, you must search for Trench first to narrow the results, and then search within that for the locus. Sorry.

The stratigraphic contexts (findspots) of artifacts from Sardis are recorded at different levels of specificity. Sector is the most general, referring to a broad area of the city. Trenches are yearly excavation areas (in current usage) or more specific areas of sectors (in early records which used a different excavation system). A Locus is a single stratigraphic unit, i.e. a single deposit of soil, a destruction level, a grave, a dump or other deposit. For instance, MMS-I 84.1 Locus 34 is the destruction level from one room of a Lydian house just inside the fortification wall in sector MMS, containing a rich deposit of Lydian pottery and other artifacts. Note that loci can be continued over a number of years, and so belong to different trenches, if the same stratigraphic unit is excavated over a number of years. For a list of sectors see Hanfmann and Waldbaum, A Survey of Sardis and the Major Monuments Outside the City Walls (Sardis R1, 1975), 13-16. Currently (2020) in order to search for a specific locus, you must search for Trench first to narrow the results, and then search within that for the locus. Sorry.

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  • Corinthian Capital with Three Heads
    Corinthian Capital with Three Heads

    R2 Cat. 210

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    Constantinian? (Roman)

    All three heads are female. The central one, quite worn, is Medusa with two snakes, summarily carved and tied in a knot under her chin. Parallel incisions in her hair indicate ringlets. The eyes are large, carved deeply all around, with a drilled cen...

  • Mountain God, Tmolus, on Drum
    Mountain God, Tmolus, on Drum

    R2 Cat. 211

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    Hellenistic? (Hellenistic)

    Near top of drum, in two lines, are the words ΦΥΛΗΣ ΤΜΩΛΙΔΟΣ. Below the inscription is a sculptured relief of the river god, Tmolus, reclining on a rocky projection representing the mountain. He is naked except for a corner of drapery falling over hi...

  • Block with Woman in Relief
    Block with Woman in Relief

    R2 Cat. 212

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    1st or 2nd C. AD (Roman)

    A priestess, praying with raised arms, stands on the end of a block. She wears a peplos, belted beneath the breasts, and an extra piece of cloth hangs diagonally across her chest. The drapery clings to both legs and falls in three heavy folds, one at...

  • Birth of Zeus and Armor on Right Gatepost
    Birth of Zeus and Armor on Right Gatepost

    R2 Cat. 213

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    2nd- 3rd C. AD (Roman)

    On the front face there are four figures, three of which overlap the edges of the rectangular recessed panel. At the bottom is a thick-bodied Atlas sitting on a rock in a frontal position, with his r. leg bent (following the curve of the rock). Upon ...

  • Fragment of Figured Bolster
    Fragment of Figured Bolster

    R2 Cat. 214

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    Hadrianic (Roman)

    An angular monkey-like male figure has bent and extended arms and legs; he looks off to his l. He is surrounded by vines and a bunch of grapes. His body is covered by a wavy pattern, marked by parallel grooves, signifying hair. The relief slab is cur...

  • Captive against Pillar
    Captive against Pillar

    R2 Cat. 215

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    Late 2nd or early 3rd C. AD (Roman)

    A captive barbarian is tied with his back against a pillar. His arms are bent at the elbows and bound behind his back. He wears a tunic girt below his chest with a broad belt. His cloak, fastened at the r. shoulder, falls in an arc across the front o...

  • Satyr Head Spout
    Satyr Head Spout

    R2 Cat. 216

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    3rd C. AD (Roman)

    The open smiling mouth is pierced by a round hole for the spout. His teeth are shown as a single horizontal band. The nose was broad. Wide open eyes have arched upper lids and single large drilled holes for the pupils. Furrows between eyebrows and on...

  • Table Legs with Eagles in Relief
    Table Legs with Eagles in Relief

    R2 Cat. 217

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    Late Hellenistic or Early Imperial (Hellenistic or Roman)

    A (at S end of table). An eagle, looking to proper r. and with wings outstretched, clutches thunderbolts with both claws. His large rounded chest (projecting 0.11 from background) and legs are covered with overlapping feathers. Upper wings have a sim...

  • Griffin Pillar
    Griffin Pillar

    R2 Cat. 218

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    1st or 2nd C. AD (Roman)

    The griffin pillar consists of a head and winged neck growing out of an acanthus plant. This in turn curves into a lion’s foot below. The griffin head has pointed ears and an open roaring mouth with tongue hanging out. His great curving chest and nec...

  • Griffin Pillar
    Griffin Pillar

    R2 Cat. 219

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    1st or 2nd C. AD (Roman)

    The griffin pillar is nearly identical to its twin Cat. 218 (Fig. 383) found nearby. The four-clawed foot is better preserved here and shows the same powerful curves typical of the whole piece.

  • Lion Pillar
    Lion Pillar

    R2 Cat. 220

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    Mid-2nd to early 3rd C. AD (Roman)

    A roaring lion’s head, heavily maned and with tongue hanging out, is atop a great curving chest which in turn grows from a lion’s foot. Behind the chest, on each side, is a flat inward-curving spiral and a rough, unfinished blank area. At the back is...

  • Lion leg from couch or throne
    Lion leg from couch or throne

    R2 Cat. 221

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    2nd or 3rd C. AD (Roman)

    A lion’s leg and paw, sweeping forward at the top into a great bulge, rests on a plinth, and is capped at the top by a flat surface to support a throne or couch. The plinth has a hole in the underside. The claws are powerfully carved, with deep groov...