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This area allows you to search for and learn about artifacts published by the Sardis Expedition. Currently (2020) the database consists of artifacts in the exhibition and catalog “The Lydians and Their World” (Yapı Kredi Vedat Nedim Tör Museum, Istanbul, 2010) and Jane Evans, Coins from the Excavations at Sardis: Their Archaeological and Economic Contexts. Coins from the 1973 to 2013 Excavations. In coming years we intend to add objects from other Sardis Reports and Monographs.

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Select an object type from the list below. Certain object types (including architectural terracottas, coins, pottery, sculpture) include subtypes (shape and ware of pottery, denomination and mint of coins) to refine your search.

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Select the language of inscribed texts from the list below.

Refine Metalwork

Refine Pottery

Refine Sculpture

Refine Architectural Terracotta

Select a material from the list below.

Select a museum from the list below.

Select a Sardis CATNUM from the list below. CATNUM is made up from object type, year, and sequential number. BI = Bone Implement; G = Glass; J = Jewelry; L = Lamp; M = Metal; NoEx = not excavated; Org = Organic; P = Pottery; S = Sculpture. Coins are numbered with the year of discovery and a running number, or year, C, and a running number. Currently (Feb. 2020) this doesn't give a complete list, only the first 99 entries; to find a specific CATNUM, please use the full-text search at the top of the page.

Select a historical period from the (alphabetical) list below. Note that periods are defined culturally rather than politically, so Lydian (rather than Archaic) refers to the period ca. 800 BC - ca. 547 BC; Late Lydian or Persian (rather than Late Archaic or Classical) from ca. 547 until ca. 330 BC; Hellenistic until the earthquake of 17 AD; Roman and Late Roman continue until the early 7th century AD, except for coins where, as traditional, Prof. Evans begins the Byzantine period in the 6th century.

Select a publication name from the list below. LATW = Lydians and Their World (2010). R2 = Hanfmann and Ramage, Sculpture from Sardis (1978). M10 = Schaeffer, Ramage, and Greenewalt, The Corinthian, Attic, and Pottery from Sardis (1997). M13 = Evans, Coins from the Excavations at Sardis, 1973-2013 (2018). M14 = Petzl, Sardis: Greek and Latin Inscriptions, Part II (2019).

Select a site from the list below.

The stratigraphic contexts (findspots) of artifacts from Sardis are recorded at different levels of specificity. Sector is the most general, referring to a broad area of the city. Trenches are yearly excavation areas (in current usage) or more specific areas of sectors (in early records which used a different excavation system). A Locus is a single stratigraphic unit, i.e. a single deposit of soil, a destruction level, a grave, a dump or other deposit. For instance, MMS-I 84.1 Locus 34 is the destruction level from one room of a Lydian house just inside the fortification wall in sector MMS, containing a rich deposit of Lydian pottery and other artifacts. Note that loci can be continued over a number of years, and so belong to different trenches, if the same stratigraphic unit is excavated over a number of years. For a list of sectors see Hanfmann and Waldbaum, A Survey of Sardis and the Major Monuments Outside the City Walls (Sardis R1, 1975), 13-16. Currently (2020) in order to search for a specific locus, you must search for Trench first to narrow the results, and then search within that for the locus. Sorry.

The stratigraphic contexts (findspots) of artifacts from Sardis are recorded at different levels of specificity. Sector is the most general, referring to a broad area of the city. Trenches are yearly excavation areas (in current usage) or more specific areas of sectors (in early records which used a different excavation system). A Locus is a single stratigraphic unit, i.e. a single deposit of soil, a destruction level, a grave, a dump or other deposit. For instance, MMS-I 84.1 Locus 34 is the destruction level from one room of a Lydian house just inside the fortification wall in sector MMS, containing a rich deposit of Lydian pottery and other artifacts. Note that loci can be continued over a number of years, and so belong to different trenches, if the same stratigraphic unit is excavated over a number of years. For a list of sectors see Hanfmann and Waldbaum, A Survey of Sardis and the Major Monuments Outside the City Walls (Sardis R1, 1975), 13-16. Currently (2020) in order to search for a specific locus, you must search for Trench first to narrow the results, and then search within that for the locus. Sorry.

The stratigraphic contexts (findspots) of artifacts from Sardis are recorded at different levels of specificity. Sector is the most general, referring to a broad area of the city. Trenches are yearly excavation areas (in current usage) or more specific areas of sectors (in early records which used a different excavation system). A Locus is a single stratigraphic unit, i.e. a single deposit of soil, a destruction level, a grave, a dump or other deposit. For instance, MMS-I 84.1 Locus 34 is the destruction level from one room of a Lydian house just inside the fortification wall in sector MMS, containing a rich deposit of Lydian pottery and other artifacts. Note that loci can be continued over a number of years, and so belong to different trenches, if the same stratigraphic unit is excavated over a number of years. For a list of sectors see Hanfmann and Waldbaum, A Survey of Sardis and the Major Monuments Outside the City Walls (Sardis R1, 1975), 13-16. Currently (2020) in order to search for a specific locus, you must search for Trench first to narrow the results, and then search within that for the locus. Sorry.

Showing 9706 results for:  
  • Capital
    Capital

    R2 Cat. 186

    Sculpture, Sarcophagus

    Marble, Stone

    Later 2nd or early 3rd C. AD (Roman)

    The deeply carved decoration of capital and arches is similar to, but not identical with, the sarcophagus of Claudia Antonia Sabina (Cat. 243 Fig. 422). The springing of the arches is also considerably steeper than on that sarcophagus. The type and d...

  • Reclining Figure on Lid
    Reclining Figure on Lid

    R2 Cat. 187

    Sculpture, Sarcophagus

    Marble, Stone

    Late 2nd or 3rd C. AD (Roman)

    The r. arm, mostly missing, lies across the body. The r. knee is slightly bent. Many small curves of drapery fall over the legs, while a long fold lies parallel to the body but behind it, on the lid. The type of reclining figure is like those of the ...

  • Amazonian Figure
    Amazonian Figure

    R2 Cat. 188

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    1st C. BC (Hellenistic)

    A small figure running to the r. wears a short tunic (to the knees) and a loose overgarment to the hips. Both tiers blow out behind. The skirt has vertical folds, the upper tier, rippled folds. The figure also wears boots with borders at the tops, an...

  • River God
    River God

    R2 Cat. 189

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    1st or 2nd C. AD (Roman)

    The reclining river god has long hair, and is nude. His l. leg is tucked under the bent r. one. In his r. hand he holds a reed, and two other vertical reeds are incised into the background at the upper l. At the r. is a plane tree in shallow relief. ...

  • River God
    River God

    R2 Cat. 190

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    3rd C. AD? (Roman)

    A youthful, unbearded river god holds a single reed in his r. hand and reclines on a rock in which a male head is carved. The lower part of his body is covered by a cloth, making a series of parallel folds over the legs; a roll of the material at the...

  • Captive
    Captive

    R2 Cat. 191

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    2nd or 3rd C. AD? (Roman)

    A male figure is seated with his legs out before him, r. leg bent at the knee, and his hands behind his back. To the r., a short distance from the man, are traces of a cuirassed Roman; and to the l. is a shallow relief of a ribbon-like object with th...

  • Fragment of Capital with Eagle and Oak Spray
    Fragment of Capital with Eagle and Oak Spray

    R2 Cat. 192

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    (Hellenistic)

    The eagle projects forward almost in the round, covering nearly the entire height of the pilaster capital. The profile at the top has a torus with a projecting animal head. Behind the l. shoulder of the eagle starts an oak spray which continues from ...

  • Pilaster Capital with Cybele or Snake Goddess
    Pilaster Capital with Cybele or Snake Goddess

    R2 Cat. 193

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    2nd half of 2nd C. AD (Roman)

    The pilaster capital consists of two flat volutes springing from a base and supported by acanthus leaves. Standing on a small projecting base is a draped woman in hieratic pose with a pomegranate (?) in her l. hand and a snake, which wriggles across ...

  • Pilaster Capital with Anatolian Goddess
    Pilaster Capital with Anatolian Goddess

    R2 Cat. 194

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    2nd half of 2nd C. AD (Roman)

    The capital is Corinthian, with volutes and acanthus leaves on a basically concave profile. At the center top is an image of a female goddess, a representation of an archaic statue. She wears a polos and a veil with an incised border, a necklace of l...

  • Pilaster Capital with Gorgon Head
    Pilaster Capital with Gorgon Head

    R2 Cat. 195

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    2nd or 3rd C. AD (Roman)

    A stylized Corinthian pilaster capital, this has unusually vertical and straight tendrils, one stem on each side breaking into two curved tendrils under the simple top profile. An acanthus leaf frames each side. In the center, between the tendrils, i...

  • Pilaster Capital with Gorgon Head
    Pilaster Capital with Gorgon Head

    R2 Cat. 196

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    2nd or 3rd C. AD (Roman)

    The head of Medusa is in the center, flanked by scrolled tendrils and acanthus leaves. The gorgon has wild disheveled hair, which waves to both sides from the center of the head. Curls are effectively shown by several layers of hair, coupled with mod...

  • Corinthian Head Capital with Zeus
    Corinthian Head Capital with Zeus

    R2 Cat. 197

    Sculpture

    Marble, Stone

    Early 3rd C. AD (Roman)

    The series of head capitals belong to the “screen colonnade” of ten double-engaged columns between the Imperial cult hall or “Marble Court,” MC, and the palaestra, Pa, at the E side of the Roman Gymnasium, B (Yegül, Bath Gymnasium Diss., 99). The col...