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This area allows you to search for and learn about artifacts published by the Sardis Expedition. Currently (2020) the database consists of artifacts in the exhibition and catalog “The Lydians and Their World” (Yapı Kredi Vedat Nedim Tör Museum, Istanbul, 2010) and Jane Evans, Coins from the Excavations at Sardis: Their Archaeological and Economic Contexts. Coins from the 1973 to 2013 Excavations. In coming years we intend to add objects from other Sardis Reports and Monographs.

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Select an object type from the list below. Certain object types (including architectural terracottas, coins, pottery, sculpture) include subtypes (shape and ware of pottery, denomination and mint of coins) to refine your search.

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Select the language of inscribed texts from the list below.

Refine Metalwork

Refine Pottery

Refine Sculpture

Refine Architectural Terracotta

Select a material from the list below.

Select a museum from the list below.

Select a Sardis CATNUM from the list below. CATNUM is made up from object type, year, and sequential number. BI = Bone Implement; G = Glass; J = Jewelry; L = Lamp; M = Metal; NoEx = not excavated; Org = Organic; P = Pottery; S = Sculpture. Coins are numbered with the year of discovery and a running number, or year, C, and a running number. Currently (Feb. 2020) this doesn't give a complete list, only the first 99 entries; to find a specific CATNUM, please use the full-text search at the top of the page.

Select a historical period from the (alphabetical) list below. Note that periods are defined culturally rather than politically, so Lydian (rather than Archaic) refers to the period ca. 800 BC - ca. 547 BC; Late Lydian or Persian (rather than Late Archaic or Classical) from ca. 547 until ca. 330 BC; Hellenistic until the earthquake of 17 AD; Roman and Late Roman continue until the early 7th century AD, except for coins where, as traditional, Prof. Evans begins the Byzantine period in the 6th century.

Select a publication name from the list below. LATW = Lydians and Their World (2010). R2 = Hanfmann and Ramage, Sculpture from Sardis (1978). M10 = Schaeffer, Ramage, and Greenewalt, The Corinthian, Attic, and Pottery from Sardis (1997). M13 = Evans, Coins from the Excavations at Sardis, 1973-2013 (2018). M14 = Petzl, Sardis: Greek and Latin Inscriptions, Part II (2019).

Select a site from the list below.

The stratigraphic contexts (findspots) of artifacts from Sardis are recorded at different levels of specificity. Sector is the most general, referring to a broad area of the city. Trenches are yearly excavation areas (in current usage) or more specific areas of sectors (in early records which used a different excavation system). A Locus is a single stratigraphic unit, i.e. a single deposit of soil, a destruction level, a grave, a dump or other deposit. For instance, MMS-I 84.1 Locus 34 is the destruction level from one room of a Lydian house just inside the fortification wall in sector MMS, containing a rich deposit of Lydian pottery and other artifacts. Note that loci can be continued over a number of years, and so belong to different trenches, if the same stratigraphic unit is excavated over a number of years. For a list of sectors see Hanfmann and Waldbaum, A Survey of Sardis and the Major Monuments Outside the City Walls (Sardis R1, 1975), 13-16. Currently (2020) in order to search for a specific locus, you must search for Trench first to narrow the results, and then search within that for the locus. Sorry.

The stratigraphic contexts (findspots) of artifacts from Sardis are recorded at different levels of specificity. Sector is the most general, referring to a broad area of the city. Trenches are yearly excavation areas (in current usage) or more specific areas of sectors (in early records which used a different excavation system). A Locus is a single stratigraphic unit, i.e. a single deposit of soil, a destruction level, a grave, a dump or other deposit. For instance, MMS-I 84.1 Locus 34 is the destruction level from one room of a Lydian house just inside the fortification wall in sector MMS, containing a rich deposit of Lydian pottery and other artifacts. Note that loci can be continued over a number of years, and so belong to different trenches, if the same stratigraphic unit is excavated over a number of years. For a list of sectors see Hanfmann and Waldbaum, A Survey of Sardis and the Major Monuments Outside the City Walls (Sardis R1, 1975), 13-16. Currently (2020) in order to search for a specific locus, you must search for Trench first to narrow the results, and then search within that for the locus. Sorry.

The stratigraphic contexts (findspots) of artifacts from Sardis are recorded at different levels of specificity. Sector is the most general, referring to a broad area of the city. Trenches are yearly excavation areas (in current usage) or more specific areas of sectors (in early records which used a different excavation system). A Locus is a single stratigraphic unit, i.e. a single deposit of soil, a destruction level, a grave, a dump or other deposit. For instance, MMS-I 84.1 Locus 34 is the destruction level from one room of a Lydian house just inside the fortification wall in sector MMS, containing a rich deposit of Lydian pottery and other artifacts. Note that loci can be continued over a number of years, and so belong to different trenches, if the same stratigraphic unit is excavated over a number of years. For a list of sectors see Hanfmann and Waldbaum, A Survey of Sardis and the Major Monuments Outside the City Walls (Sardis R1, 1975), 13-16. Currently (2020) in order to search for a specific locus, you must search for Trench first to narrow the results, and then search within that for the locus. Sorry.

Showing 9706 results for:  
  • Silver kyathos (ladle)
    Silver kyathos (ladle)

    LATW Cat. 165

    Metalwork

    Silver

    Late sixth or early fifth century BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    The shallow bowl has thick walls and is flat at the bottom. The stem, of round section, is formed in one with the bowl. Soldered to the top is a plain vertical ring, its orientation the same as that of the bowl (Özgen and Öztürk 1996). Height 0.198 m...

  • Silver strainer
    Silver strainer

    LATW Cat. 166

    Metalwork

    Silver

    Late sixth or early fifth century BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    The strainer has a hemispherical bowl and a broad concave rim. The handle projects at a slight angle. Below a plain zone, the bowl is perforated in a swirling pattern; 21 perforated arcs, curving counterclockwise, radiate from the center on the floor...

  • Silver and gold phiale with Persian king/hero
    Silver and gold phiale with Persian king/hero

    LATW Cat. 167

    Metalwork

    Silver

    Late sixth or early fifth century BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    The shallow bowl has an offset rim, and an extremely shallow omphalos with a centering mark on the underside. The bowl itself is silver, the gold decoration was made separately and applied. The ten tear-shaped lobes are hollow, slotted into grooves o...

  • Silver phiale
    Silver phiale

    LATW Cat. 168

    Metalwork

    Silver

    Late sixth or early fifth century BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    The deep shouldered bowl has an offset lip, outturned at the rim, and a shallow omphalos with a centering mark on the underside. Spaced evenly around the upper zone of the wall are eighteen male heads, and the lower zone is decorated with seventy-two...

  • Silver phiale, with inscription
    Silver phiale, with inscription

    LATW Cat. 169

    Metalwork

    Silver

    Late sixth or early fifth century BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    “The shallow bowl has a sharply flaring offset lip, and a shallow omphalos with a centering mark on the underside. Radiating from an engraved circle around the omphalos are eighty-seven lightly chased tongues, defined around the top by scalloping. Ar...

  • Shallow bowl with inscription
    Shallow bowl with inscription

    LATW Cat. 170

    Metalwork, Inscription

    Silver

    Late sixth or early fifth century BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    The shallow dish is has a horizontal everted rim, and the bottom is flat, with a centering mark on the floor. On the underside of the bowl is inscribed the word “MATTVA”, written retrograde.

    The word “MATTVA” may be Lydian or Greek, and, according to...

  • Jasper (Chalcedony) plate
    Jasper (Chalcedony) plate

    LATW Cat. 171

    Stone Vessel

    Chalcedony, Stone

    Second half of sixth or early fifth century BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    Shallow plate or dish of creamy jasper, with red and brown veins. Wide, flat bottom, carinated body, horizontal rim. Diameter 0.145, height 0.03.

  • Silver side-spouted dish with Phrygian inscription
    Silver side-spouted dish with Phrygian inscription

    LATW Cat. 172

    Metalwork, Inscription

    Silver

    Second half of sixth or early fifth century BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    Small single-handled silver dish with a side spout (now missing). Low foot, carinated body, horizontally everted lip. Loop handle ending in ducks’ heads attached to body under lip. At point 90° to handle, perforated opening in wall, which originally ...

  • Bronze incense burner
    Bronze incense burner

    LATW Cat. 173

    Metalwork

    Bronze/Copper Alloy

    Late sixth or early fifth century BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    This incense burner has a long carrying handle which projects horizontally from the cup. The form of the cup resembles that of the incense burners on pedestals, but the base is flat. The conical cover is composed of five tiers, the lowest of which sl...

  • Pair of gold rattles from Toptepe
    Pair of gold rattles from Toptepe

    LATW Cat. 174

    Metalwork

    Gold

    Late sixth or early fifth century BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    The two spool-shaped rattles are virtually identical. Each is formed from two disk-shaped end pieces, a side sheet with concave profile and a central cylindrical tube which is turned over at the ends to secure the disks. One has seventeen concentric ...

  • Necklace with acorn pendants, from Toptepe
    Necklace with acorn pendants, from Toptepe

    LATW Cat. 175

    Metalwork, Jewelry and Ornaments

    Gold, Stone, Glass

    Late sixth or early fifth century BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    The necklace is composed of twenty floral beads and eighteen plain beads with acorn pendents. Each floral bead is decorated with two six-petal rosettes that radiate from perforations at opposite ends of the bead and make contact at the petal tips. Th...

  • Electrum necklace from Lydian Treasure
    Electrum necklace from Lydian Treasure

    LATW Cat. 176

    Jewelry and Ornaments

    Electrum

    Late sixth or early fifth century BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    The necklace has been reconstructed from thirty beads of two kinds and seventeen pendants of two kinds. Twenty-six of the threaded beads are plain spheres, slightly indented around the perforations. They are made of sheet in two halves; the halves of...