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This area allows you to search for and learn about artifacts published by the Sardis Expedition. Currently (2017) the database consists of artifacts in the exhibition and catalog “The Lydians and Their World” (Yapı Kredi Vedat Nedim Tör Museum, Istanbul, 2010). In coming months we intend to add objects from all Sardis Reports and Monographs.

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Select an object type from the list below. Certain object types (including architectural terracottas, coins, pottery, sculpture) include subtypes (shape and ware of pottery, denomination and mint of coins) to refine your search.

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Select a Sardis CATNUM from the list below. CATNUM is made up from object type, year, and sequential number. BI = Bone Implement; G = Glass; J = Jewelry; L = Lamp; M = Metal; NoEx = not excavated; Org = Organic; P = Pottery; S = Sculpture. Coins are numbered with the year of discovery and a running number, or year, C, and a running number.

Select a historical period from the (alphabetical) list below.

Select a publication name from the list below. For abbreviations, please see the list of publications (linked from the top of the page)

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The stratigraphic contexts (findspots) of artifacts from Sardis are recorded at different levels of specificity. Sector is the most general, referring to a broad area of the city. Trenches are yearly excavation areas (in current usage) or more specific areas of sectors (in early records which used a different excavation system). A Locus is a single stratigraphic unit, i.e. a single deposit of soil, a destruction level, a grave, a dump or other deposit. For instance, MMS-I 84.1 Locus 34 is the destruction level from a Lydian house just inside the fortification wall in sector MMS, containing a rich deposit of Lydian pottery and other artifacts. Note that loci can be continued over a number of years, and so belong to different trenches, if the same stratigraphic unit is excavated over a number of years. For a list of sectors see Hanfmann and Waldbaum, A Survey of Sardis and the Major Monuments Outside the City Walls (Sardis R1, 1975), 13-16.

The stratigraphic contexts (findspots) of artifacts from Sardis are recorded at different levels of specificity. Sector is the most general, referring to a broad area of the city. Trenches are yearly excavation areas (in current usage) or more specific areas of sectors (in early records which used a different excavation system). A Locus is a single stratigraphic unit, i.e. a single deposit of soil, a destruction level, a grave, a dump or other deposit. For instance, MMS-I 84.1 Locus 34 is the destruction level from a Lydian house just inside the fortification wall in sector MMS, containing a rich deposit of Lydian pottery and other artifacts. Note that loci can be continued over a number of years, and so belong to different trenches, if the same stratigraphic unit is excavated over a number of years. For a list of sectors see Hanfmann and Waldbaum, A Survey of Sardis and the Major Monuments Outside the City Walls (Sardis R1, 1975), 13-16.

The stratigraphic contexts (findspots) of artifacts from Sardis are recorded at different levels of specificity. Sector is the most general, referring to a broad area of the city. Trenches are yearly excavation areas (in current usage) or more specific areas of sectors (in early records which used a different excavation system). A Locus is a single stratigraphic unit, i.e. a single deposit of soil, a destruction level, a grave, a dump or other deposit. For instance, MMS-I 84.1 Locus 34 is the destruction level from a Lydian house just inside the fortification wall in sector MMS, containing a rich deposit of Lydian pottery and other artifacts. Note that loci can be continued over a number of years, and so belong to different trenches, if the same stratigraphic unit is excavated over a number of years. For a list of sectors see Hanfmann and Waldbaum, A Survey of Sardis and the Major Monuments Outside the City Walls (Sardis R1, 1975), 13-16.

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  • Silver Ram Pendant
    Silver Ram Pendant

    Jewelry and Ornaments

    Silver

    Early Bronze Age, ca. 2500-2000 BC (Early Bronze Age)

    Pendant in form of a ram. Elongated cylindrical body perforated just above stumps of forelegs. Cylindrical neck at oblique angle to body. Small head with rounded nose; horns in relief curve back and around on either side of head. Tiny tail points ...

  • Pair of Gold “earplugs”
    Pair of Gold “earplugs”

    Jewelry and Ornaments

    Gold

    Early Bronze Age, ca. 2500-2000 BC (Early Bronze Age)

    Two bullet-shaped “earplugs,” made of sheets of argentiferous gold wrapped around a core of dark material. Conical terminal with hatched decoration; concave shaft with flat end. Tips pierced. Length 0.023 m; diameter of conical end 0.009 m.

  • Copper (Alloy?) Dagger
    Copper (Alloy?) Dagger

    Metalwork

    Copper, Bronze

    Early Bronze Age, ca. 2500-2000 BC (Early Bronze Age)

    Copper or copper alloy. Lozenge-shaped blade with rounded, perforated butt end and sharply tapered point. Widest part of blade nearest butt. Flattened lozenge-shaped section. ...

  • Cutaway-Spouted Jug
    Cutaway-Spouted Jug

    Pottery

    Ceramic

    Early Bronze Age, ca. 2500-2000 BC (Early Bronze Age)

    Round bottom, slightly globular body. Offset neck high and straight (almost vertical) in front, short and curved in back, with mouth at steep angle. Oval section handle attached via tenon. Tiny (0.0035 m) hole below right rear lug. Three pellets a...

  • Small Tankard
    Small Tankard

    Pottery

    Ceramic

    Early Bronze Age, ca. 2500-2000 BC (Early Bronze Age)

    Flat bottom, ovoid body (flattened to one side), continuous concave neck, flaring rim with rounded lip. Two holes in rim, one on each side, above two lugs at maximum diameter. One lug pierced, one lug grooved. Two knobs at maximum diameter between...

  • Stone Idol
    Stone Idol

    Sculpture

    Stone

    Early Bronze Age, ca. 2700-2000 BC (Early Bronze Age)

    White stone idol of flat, abstract form with rounded, shovel-shaped body, stump arms, projecting neck, and disc-shaped head. Arms are delineated from body by notches on the sides and shallow grooves at the clavicles, the only apparent alterations ...

  • Copper (Alloy?) Adze
    Copper (Alloy?) Adze

    Metalwork

    Copper, Bronze

    Early Bronze Age? (Early Bronze Age)

    Copper or copper alloy. Broad, flat blade, roughly trapezoidal in shape. Blade end wider and slightly rounded; butt end rectangular and narrower for hafting.

  • Copper (Alloy?) Dagger
    Copper (Alloy?) Dagger

    Metalwork

    Copper, Bronze

    Early Bronze Age, ca. 2500–2000 BC (Early Bronze Age)

    Copper or copper alloy. Long, lozenge-shaped blade with rounded butt end with no rivet hole and tapered point. Widest part of blade nearest haft.

  • Marble Stele of Atrastas
    Marble Stele of Atrastas

    Sculpture, Inscription

    Marble, Stone

    520-500 BC (Hanfmann); fourth century BC (Bossert) (Late Lydian (Persian))

    Stele of white marble. Above, relief showing a man seated on a stool at a table, behind him an indistinct form that has been variously identified (standing child, Bossert; foreparts of a dog, Hanfmann). The man either has a disproportionately long...

  • Grave Stele from Haliller
    Grave Stele from Haliller

    Sculpture, Inscription

    Marble, Stone

    Shortly after the middle of the fourth century BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    At the top of the stele, “a local version of an anthemion finial of lyre-volute type. In place of the usual palmette is a schematic rendering of a bird in flight, with splayed wing feathers substituting for palmette leaves” ...

  • Relief from Gökçeler
    Relief from Gökçeler

    Sculpture

    Limestone, Stone

    Probably early fifth century BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    “Brownish yellow chalky limestone. Figure stands on a 0.18 m high plinth to left in a long-sleeved, knee-length tunic and sandals, holding a flower bud forward in right hand and a bird at side in left hand. Hair in tight curls. Lips and eyes aroun...

  • Sandstone Lion from Altar of Cybele, Pactolus North
    Sandstone Lion from Altar of Cybele, Pactolus North

    Sculpture

    Sandstone, Stone

    Ca. 570-560 BC (Lydian)

    One of two and one-half sandstone lion sculptures that were set up on the corners of the Altar of Cybele in the gold refining area at Sardis (Sector PN; see...