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This area allows you to search for and learn about artifacts published by the Sardis Expedition. Currently (2017) the database consists of artifacts in the exhibition and catalog “The Lydians and Their World” (Yapı Kredi Vedat Nedim Tör Museum, Istanbul, 2010). In coming months we intend to add objects from all Sardis Reports and Monographs.

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Select an object type from the list below. Certain object types (including architectural terracottas, coins, pottery, sculpture) include subtypes (shape and ware of pottery, denomination and mint of coins) to refine your search.

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Select a Sardis CATNUM from the list below. CATNUM is made up from object type, year, and sequential number. BI = Bone Implement; G = Glass; J = Jewelry; L = Lamp; M = Metal; NoEx = not excavated; Org = Organic; P = Pottery; S = Sculpture. Coins are numbered with the year of discovery and a running number, or year, C, and a running number.

Select a historical period from the (alphabetical) list below.

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The stratigraphic contexts (findspots) of artifacts from Sardis are recorded at different levels of specificity. Sector is the most general, referring to a broad area of the city. Trenches are yearly excavation areas (in current usage) or more specific areas of sectors (in early records which used a different excavation system). A Locus is a single stratigraphic unit, i.e. a single deposit of soil, a destruction level, a grave, a dump or other deposit. For instance, MMS-I 84.1 Locus 34 is the destruction level from a Lydian house just inside the fortification wall in sector MMS, containing a rich deposit of Lydian pottery and other artifacts. Note that loci can be continued over a number of years, and so belong to different trenches, if the same stratigraphic unit is excavated over a number of years. For a list of sectors see Hanfmann and Waldbaum, A Survey of Sardis and the Major Monuments Outside the City Walls (Sardis R1, 1975), 13-16.

The stratigraphic contexts (findspots) of artifacts from Sardis are recorded at different levels of specificity. Sector is the most general, referring to a broad area of the city. Trenches are yearly excavation areas (in current usage) or more specific areas of sectors (in early records which used a different excavation system). A Locus is a single stratigraphic unit, i.e. a single deposit of soil, a destruction level, a grave, a dump or other deposit. For instance, MMS-I 84.1 Locus 34 is the destruction level from a Lydian house just inside the fortification wall in sector MMS, containing a rich deposit of Lydian pottery and other artifacts. Note that loci can be continued over a number of years, and so belong to different trenches, if the same stratigraphic unit is excavated over a number of years. For a list of sectors see Hanfmann and Waldbaum, A Survey of Sardis and the Major Monuments Outside the City Walls (Sardis R1, 1975), 13-16.

The stratigraphic contexts (findspots) of artifacts from Sardis are recorded at different levels of specificity. Sector is the most general, referring to a broad area of the city. Trenches are yearly excavation areas (in current usage) or more specific areas of sectors (in early records which used a different excavation system). A Locus is a single stratigraphic unit, i.e. a single deposit of soil, a destruction level, a grave, a dump or other deposit. For instance, MMS-I 84.1 Locus 34 is the destruction level from a Lydian house just inside the fortification wall in sector MMS, containing a rich deposit of Lydian pottery and other artifacts. Note that loci can be continued over a number of years, and so belong to different trenches, if the same stratigraphic unit is excavated over a number of years. For a list of sectors see Hanfmann and Waldbaum, A Survey of Sardis and the Major Monuments Outside the City Walls (Sardis R1, 1975), 13-16.

Showing 234 results for:  
  • Ritual Dinner Dish
    Ritual Dinner Dish

    Pottery

    Ceramic

    Ca. 575-525 BC (Lydian)

    Missing part of rim, all of central zone, and foot; about one-fourth to one-third complete. Clay reddish-tan, micaceous, friable. Inside, on rim, and outside around rim, reddish slip over which decoration in black slip as follows: inside, three (s...

  • Ritual Dinner Iron Knife
    Ritual Dinner Iron Knife

    Metalwork

    Iron

    Ca. 575-525 BC (Lydian)

    Iron. Blade and tang. Stoney accretions on blade. On tang, orange powdery substance with wood-like grain. Total length 0.229 m, length of tang 0.05 m.

  • Ritual Dinner immature canid bones
    Ritual Dinner immature canid bones

    Miscellaneous

    Bone

    Ca. 575-525 BC (Lydian)

    “skeleton…almost complete. Missing (in 1974 examination by Fitzgerald and Trum) lumbar, sacral and some caudal vertebrae (three of the last present); some carpals, metacarpals, tarsals, metatarsals; portions of skull (no sagittal crest); baculum. ...

  • Bridle attachment (?) in the form of a boar
    Bridle attachment (?) in the form of a boar

    Metalwork

    Bronze

    Ca. 580-540 BC (Lydian)

    Bronze, with dull green patina. Solid-cast, with incised lines and indented dots added after casting. The front side shows recumbent boar to right, with jaw resting on lower foreleg, body resting on lower hind leg; tail across haunch, with long te...

  • Bridle attachment (?) in the form of a wild goat, unfinished
    Bridle attachment (?) in the form of a wild goat, unfinished

    Metalwork

    Bronze

    Ca. 580-540 BC (Lydian)

    Bronze (for the composition, Waldbaum 1983b, 67), with many surface pocks of irregular form. Solid cast. The front side shows recumbent wild goat to left, with head r...

  • Bridle ornament in the form of a raptor head
    Bridle ornament in the form of a raptor head

    Metalwork

    Bronze, Lead

    Late seventh to early sixth centuries BC (Lydian)

    Bronze, with a filling of lead. The ornament features a raptor “head with solid curved beak and hollow neck forming base. The round eyes are in relief; pupil and beak defined by incision. The neck is pierced laterally by four circular openings; a ...

  • Bronze strap crossing
    Bronze strap crossing

    Metalwork

    Bronze

    Second quarter to middle of the 6th century BC (Lydian)

    Round bronze object consisting of slightly tapering cylinder pierced at four quadrants and at bottom, crowned by cloverleaf-like disk, with its notches directly over the holes. Complete; corroded; lump of iron corroded to interior. Height 0.011, d...

  • Ivory Head
    Ivory Head

    Bone and Ivory, Sculpture

    Ivory

    Sixth century BC (Lydian)

    “Above the forehead and back of the head are flat surfaces…On each cheek is a horizontal crescent-shaped depression, and below the lower lip is still another depression.…The ears are large and fully modeled. Attached to each is a large circular ea...

  • Ivory head of deer
    Ivory head of deer

    Bone and Ivory

    Ivory

    Ca. 640-625 BC (Lydian)

    Ivory, broken at bottom and left top. The front surface shows parts of a deer, to left: head, upper neck, posterior antler, and the upper part of its rump. The eye is defined by an incised circle and dot, and has an incised duct; the end of the no...

  • Bone appliqué, decorated with curled animal
    Bone appliqué, decorated with curled animal

    Bone and Ivory

    Bone

    Ca. 650 BC (Lydian)

    Bone plaque of irregular round shape. The front side has an arcuated profile and shows a curled animal with round eye and ear that extend beyond the round outline. The eye has an inner incised circle and central dot; the ear has a triangular cut a...

  • Bone inlay, decorated with two birds’ heads
    Bone inlay, decorated with two birds’ heads

    Bone and Ivory

    Bone

    Ca. 625-580 BC? (Lydian)

    Bone plaque, round. The front side has an arcuated profile and shows two birds’ heads with large bills, the lower bill of one adjoining the upper bill of the other, occupying ca. two-thirds of the surface. Heads emerge from the straight border of ...

  • Architectural terracotta: head of a bearded man
    Architectural terracotta: head of a bearded man

    Architectural Terracotta

    Terracotta

    Middle of the sixth century BC (Lydian)

    Terracotta fragment of a sima or geison, molded and painted with cream, dark sepia, and red-brown slips, showing head and shoulders of a bearded man, facing right. Background, flesh parts, and perhaps entire form are covered with cream slip, and o...