• latw-82-1
    Stemmed dish with graffito of deer and dog. (Courtesy of the Vedat Nedim Tör Museum, Istanbul)

Stemmed dish with graffito of deer and dog

Date
Ca. mid-sixth century BC, Lydian
Museum
Manisa, Archaeological and Ethnographic Museum, 7385
Inventory No.
7385
Sardis CATNUM
P87.048
Material
Ceramic
Object Type
Pottery
Pottery Shape
Stemmed Dish
Pottery Ware
Lydian Tableware
Site
Sardis
Sector
MMS
Trench
MMS-I 86.1
Locus
MMS-I 86.1 Locus 124
Description
Ceramic stemmed dish with flaring foot, plain stem, relatively deep plate with upturned lip. Matte eroded dark streaky-glaze on floor of plate, outside of rim, lower stem and foot. Graffiti: on bottom of plate, a carefully incised deer, leaping up and looking over its shoulder; and facing the deer, a hound leaping forward. Almost complete, mended from many fragments. Height 0.12 m, diameter of rim 0.217 m.
Comments
From kitchen of a Lydian house (Area 3, with Nos. 61, 63, 78, 80, 83, 84, 85, 86) in a pile of 23 almost identical dishes, many of which bear graffiti incised after firing (Nos. 83, 84, 85). The graffiti might mark ownership of the vessels; see Roller 1987. Most are fairly simple signs or letters (e.g.s., Nos. 83, 84, 85); this is the most elaborate, with a carefully incised dog pursuing a deer. The stemmed dish (sometimes called a “fruitstand”) is another of the most common shapes of Lydian pottery, used for everyday eating. Unlike the skyphos, though, it is probably of Anatolian and East Greek origin; examples at Sardis date back into the eighth century BC. Confer the earlier and much more finely painted examples, perhaps from a very elite, rather than a normal, domestic context, Nos. 92 and 93, and the example from Gordion No. 107.
Discussed
Greenewalt, “Lydian Pottery”; Cahill, “City of Sardis”; Cahill, “Persian Sack”
Bibliography
Greenewalt et al. 1990, 149, n. 18, fig. 11; Greenewalt 1991, 15, n. 25, fig. 21; Cahill 2000.
Author
NDC