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This area allows you to search for and learn about artifacts published by the Sardis Expedition. Currently (2017) the database consists of artifacts in the exhibition and catalog “The Lydians and Their World” (Yapı Kredi Vedat Nedim Tör Museum, Istanbul, 2010). In coming months we intend to add objects from all Sardis Reports and Monographs.

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Select an object type from the list below. Certain object types (including architectural terracottas, coins, pottery, sculpture) include subtypes (shape and ware of pottery, denomination and mint of coins) to refine your search.

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Select a Sardis CATNUM from the list below. CATNUM is made up from object type, year, and sequential number. BI = Bone Implement; G = Glass; J = Jewelry; L = Lamp; M = Metal; NoEx = not excavated; Org = Organic; P = Pottery; S = Sculpture. Coins are numbered with the year of discovery and a running number, or year, C, and a running number.

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The stratigraphic contexts (findspots) of artifacts from Sardis are recorded at different levels of specificity. Sector is the most general, referring to a broad area of the city. Trenches are yearly excavation areas (in current usage) or more specific areas of sectors (in early records which used a different excavation system). A Locus is a single stratigraphic unit, i.e. a single deposit of soil, a destruction level, a grave, a dump or other deposit. For instance, MMS-I 84.1 Locus 34 is the destruction level from a Lydian house just inside the fortification wall in sector MMS, containing a rich deposit of Lydian pottery and other artifacts. Note that loci can be continued over a number of years, and so belong to different trenches, if the same stratigraphic unit is excavated over a number of years. For a list of sectors see Hanfmann and Waldbaum, A Survey of Sardis and the Major Monuments Outside the City Walls (Sardis R1, 1975), 13-16.

The stratigraphic contexts (findspots) of artifacts from Sardis are recorded at different levels of specificity. Sector is the most general, referring to a broad area of the city. Trenches are yearly excavation areas (in current usage) or more specific areas of sectors (in early records which used a different excavation system). A Locus is a single stratigraphic unit, i.e. a single deposit of soil, a destruction level, a grave, a dump or other deposit. For instance, MMS-I 84.1 Locus 34 is the destruction level from a Lydian house just inside the fortification wall in sector MMS, containing a rich deposit of Lydian pottery and other artifacts. Note that loci can be continued over a number of years, and so belong to different trenches, if the same stratigraphic unit is excavated over a number of years. For a list of sectors see Hanfmann and Waldbaum, A Survey of Sardis and the Major Monuments Outside the City Walls (Sardis R1, 1975), 13-16.

The stratigraphic contexts (findspots) of artifacts from Sardis are recorded at different levels of specificity. Sector is the most general, referring to a broad area of the city. Trenches are yearly excavation areas (in current usage) or more specific areas of sectors (in early records which used a different excavation system). A Locus is a single stratigraphic unit, i.e. a single deposit of soil, a destruction level, a grave, a dump or other deposit. For instance, MMS-I 84.1 Locus 34 is the destruction level from a Lydian house just inside the fortification wall in sector MMS, containing a rich deposit of Lydian pottery and other artifacts. Note that loci can be continued over a number of years, and so belong to different trenches, if the same stratigraphic unit is excavated over a number of years. For a list of sectors see Hanfmann and Waldbaum, A Survey of Sardis and the Major Monuments Outside the City Walls (Sardis R1, 1975), 13-16.

Showing 33 results for:   Late Lydian (Persian) / Jewelry and Ornaments
  • Thirty-eight gold appliqués
    Thirty-eight gold appliqués

    Metalwork, Jewelry and Ornaments

    Gold

    Late sixth or early fifth century BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    Each of the thirty-six square plaques bears an embossed pictorial scene of a raptor swooping down to lower right above a hare running to the right. Around the scene and in the field are rows of tiny raised dots. Below the hare’s body is a horizont...

  • Gold appliqué - 4 bow coils
    Gold appliqué - 4 bow coils

    Metalwork, Jewelry and Ornaments

    Gold

    Late sixth or early fifth century BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    The ornament has a cruciform shape, and comprises four bow-coils formed from beaded wire, set back to back against a central circle of beaded wire. The coils and central circle enclose convex fillings, and are soldered to a backing sheet cut to th...

  • Electrum recumbent animal
    Electrum recumbent animal

    Jewelry and Ornaments

    Electrum

    Late sixth or early fifth century BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    The animal is shown lying right, with head facing, and legs folded beneath the body. It has a flat oval base edged with beaded wire. It can be seen clearly that the animal was made in two halves, with the edge of the back half overlapping the fron...

  • Gold recumbent ram
    Gold recumbent ram

    Metalwork, Jewelry and Ornaments

    Gold

    Late sixth or early fifth century BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    The ram is shown lying left, with head facing, and legs folded beneath the body. The animal is formed in one piece with an oval base of small dimensions. Both body and base are punched with dotted circles, and the hatching on the bead is bordered ...

  • Silver recumbent ram from Lydian Treasure
    Silver recumbent ram from Lydian Treasure

    Jewelry and Ornaments

    Silver

    Late sixth or early fifth century BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    The ram is shown lying left, with head facing, and legs folded beneath the body. The fleece is marked by stippling in regular lines, and the head by hatching. The horns are ridged. The articulation of the stylized hind legs and the hooves is promi...

  • Silver bracelet
    Silver bracelet

    Metalwork, Jewelry and Ornaments

    Silver

    Probably early fifth century BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    Silver bracelet or armlet with open ends terminating in calves’ heads facing one another. Diameter 0.061 m, thickness of ring 0.004 m.

  • Silver bracelet
    Silver bracelet

    Metalwork, Jewelry and Ornaments

    Silver

    Probably early fifth century BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    Silver bracelet with open ends terminating in calves’ heads facing one another. Diameter 0.061 m, thickness of ring 0.004 m.

  • Gold recumbent lamb
    Gold recumbent lamb

    Jewelry and Ornaments

    Gold

    Early fifth century BC? (Late Lydian (Persian))

    The ram is shown lying left with head facing. The body is stamped with dot-in-circles. Divided hoofs and their differentiation from lower legs are articulated by indentations. A row of granulation granules or beaded wire encircles the base. Height...

  • Gold seal ring with stone bezel
    Gold seal ring with stone bezel

    Jewelry and Ornaments, Seal

    Gold, Stone

    Probably early fifth century BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    Gold and carnelian (?). The hoop of the ring is round in section and uniform in diameter, and terminates in two lions’ heads with collars. Each collar is formed of a pair of thick gold wires framing a row of large granulation granules. The lions’ ...