• latw-77-1
    Streaky-glaze skyphos with reserve band. (Courtesy of the Vedat Nedim Tör Museum, Istanbul)

Streaky-glaze skyphos with reserve band

Date
Ca. mid-sixth century BC, Lydian
Museum
Manisa, Archaeological and Ethnographic Museum, 8150
Inventory No.
8150
Sardis CATNUM
P95.023
Material
Ceramic
Object Type
Pottery
Pottery Shape
Skyphos
Pottery Ware
Lydian Tableware
Site
Sardis
Sector
MMS
Trench
MMS-I 93.1
Locus
MMS-I 86.1 Locus 109
Description
Ceramic skyphos. Thin-walled conical foot, swelling body turning in slightly to plain rim. Two slightly upturned horizontal handles. Interior and exterior painted with slightly matte streaky-glaze, leaving an unpainted zone at the handles. Sets of three white bands at bottom of foot, below handle zone on exterior, below rim on interior and in center of interior (these quite worn, from use?). Mended, almost complete. Height 0.102 m, diameter of rim 0.109 m.
Comments
This type of skyphos (also called a kotyle) is derived, like the column krater (No. 73), from the Corinthian shape, and is among the most common type of Lydian drinking cup (see Greenewalt, “Bon Appetit”). Unlike the column krater, however, the streaky-glaze skyphos is common at Sardis in levels of the seventh century BC, and seems to represent an earlier adoption of Greek shapes by the Lydians. It was used perhaps not only for wine but for general consumption of liquids and perhaps solids as well. The vases were painted with a brush while the pot spun on the potter’s wheel, leaving an unpainted band around the handles, where the potter had to lift the brush.

From the court of a Lydian house (Area 4-6, with Nos. 67, 70, 71, 76, 79, 89, 98, 99).

Discussed
Greenewalt, “Lydian Pottery”; Greenewalt, “Bon Appetit”; Cahill, “Persian Sack”
Bibliography
Greenewalt et al. 1995.
Author
NDC