• latw-68-1
    Iron grater from a Lydian house. (©Archaeological Exploration of Sardis/President and Fellows of Harvard College)

Iron grater

Date
Before mid-sixth century BC, Lydian
Museum
Inventory No.
Sardis CATNUM
M84.017
Material
Iron
Object Type
Metalwork
Metalwork Type
Miscellaneous
Site
Sardis
Sector
MMS
Trench
MMS-I 84.1
Locus
MMS-I 84.1 Locus 34
Description
Iron. Rectangular sheet reinforced along the long sides by two narrow strips, one of which has slipped out of position and lies diagonally across the sheet. (The method of attachment has not been identified.) The main sheet was perforated with many small holes, ca. 33-35 across the length, ca. 19-20 across the width. Main sheet: length 0.152 m, width 0.093 m, thickness 0.002 m. Width of narrow strips ca. 0.008 m and 0.004 m.
Comments
From a Lydian house destroyed in the mid-sixth century BC (Area 1, with Nos. 16, 62, 64, 65, 66, 72, 73, 75, 81, 87, 88, 96, 97, 100, 102, 103, 137, 138), together with two cooking pots and stand No. 62.

Grated bread (knestos artos) was an ingredient of the Lydian stew called kandaulos, and was used in Ionia, according to Hegisippos of Tarentum, as preserved in Athenaeus 12.516d, and Artemidorus of Ephesus, as preserved in Athenaeus 3.111d.

For a copper grater from a tomb of the 6th century BC at Ialysos on Rhodes, see Jacopi 1929, 192 and fig. 186.

Discussed
Cahill, “City of Sardis”; Greenewalt, “Bon Appetit”; Cahill, “Persian Sack”
Bibliography
Cahill in Greenewalt et al. 1988, 28.
Author
NDC