• latw-172-10
    Silver side-spouted dish with Phrygian inscription. (Courtesy of the Vedat Nedim Tör Museum, Istanbul)
  • latw-172-20
    Silver side-spouted dish with Phrygian inscription, from side. (Courtesy of the Vedat Nedim Tör Museum, Istanbul)
  • latw-172-30
    Silver side-spouted dish with Phrygian inscription. Detail of handle. (Courtesy of the Vedat Nedim Tör Museum, Istanbul)
  • latw-172-40
    Silver side-spouted dish with Phrygian inscription. Detail of handle. (Courtesy of the Vedat Nedim Tör Museum, Istanbul)
  • latw-172-50
    Silver side-spouted dish with Phrygian inscription. Detail of base and inscription. (Courtesy of the Vedat Nedim Tör Museum, Istanbul)
  • latw-172-60
    Silver side-spouted dish with Phrygian inscription. Detail of strainer spout. (Courtesy of the Vedat Nedim Tör Museum, Istanbul)
  • latw-172-70
    Silver side-spouted dish with Phrygian inscription. Detail of handle and bottom. (Courtesy of the Vedat Nedim Tör Museum, Istanbul)

Silver side-spouted dish with Phrygian inscription

Date
Second half of sixth or early fifth century BC, Late Lydian (Persian)
Museum
Ankara, Museum of Anatolian Civilizations, 75.5.66
Inventory No.
75.5.66
Material
Silver
Object Type
Metalwork
Metalwork Type
Metal Vessel
Inscription language
Phrygian
Inscription Text
Milas or Midas
Inscription Translation
Milas or Midas
Inscription Comment
Site
Ikiztepe Tumulus
Description
Small single-handled silver dish with a side spout (now missing). Low foot, carinated body, horizontally everted lip. Loop handle ending in ducks’ heads attached to body under lip. At point 90° to handle, perforated opening in wall, which originally led to a separately attached spout, now missing. On the foot, a lightly incised graffito, beginning with the name Milas or Midas. Height 0.03 m, diameter 0.102 m, weight 98.53 g.
Comments
The side-spouted bowl is particularly common in Phrygian pottery and metalwork; many examples are found in tombs and occupation layers at Gordion. The shape is known in Lydian pottery as well, however, as well as in other Near Eastern cultures; see the ceramic example with marbled decoration (Greenewalt, “Bon Appetit”). Although strainer-spouted vessels are often associated with drinking beer, they could certainly be used for other liquids; and strainers are commonly associated with metal wine sets as well (see Moorey 1980).
Discussed
Özgen, “Lydian Treasure”; Greenewalt, “Bon Appetit”; Baughan, “Lydian Burial Customs”; Greenewalt, “Introduction”
Bibliography
Özgen and Öztürk 1996, no. 60; inscription: Gusmani 1988; Brixhe 1989-1990; Orel 1996.
Author
NDC