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This area allows you to search for and learn about artifacts published by the Sardis Expedition. Currently (2020) the database consists of artifacts in the exhibition and catalog “The Lydians and Their World” (Yapı Kredi Vedat Nedim Tör Museum, Istanbul, 2010) and Jane Evans, Coins from the Excavations at Sardis: Their Archaeological and Economic Contexts. Coins from the 1973 to 2013 Excavations. In coming years we intend to add objects from other Sardis Reports and Monographs.

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Select an object type from the list below. Certain object types (including architectural terracottas, coins, pottery, sculpture) include subtypes (shape and ware of pottery, denomination and mint of coins) to refine your search.

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Select the language of inscribed texts from the list below.

Refine Metalwork

Refine Pottery

Refine Sculpture

Refine Architectural Terracotta

Select a material from the list below.

Select a museum from the list below.

Select a Sardis CATNUM from the list below. CATNUM is made up from object type, year, and sequential number. BI = Bone Implement; G = Glass; J = Jewelry; L = Lamp; M = Metal; NoEx = not excavated; Org = Organic; P = Pottery; S = Sculpture. Coins are numbered with the year of discovery and a running number, or year, C, and a running number. Currently (Feb. 2020) this doesn't give a complete list, only the first 99 entries; to find a specific CATNUM, please use the full-text search at the top of the page.

Select a historical period from the (alphabetical) list below. Note that periods are defined culturally rather than politically, so Lydian (rather than Archaic) refers to the period ca. 800 BC - ca. 547 BC; Late Lydian or Persian (rather than Late Archaic or Classical) from ca. 547 until ca. 330 BC; Hellenistic until the earthquake of 17 AD; Roman and Late Roman continue until the early 7th century AD, except for coins where, as traditional, Prof. Evans begins the Byzantine period in the 6th century.

Select a publication name from the list below. LATW = Lydians and Their World (2010). R2 = Hanfmann and Ramage, Sculpture from Sardis (1978). M10 = Schaeffer, Ramage, and Greenewalt, The Corinthian, Attic, and Pottery from Sardis (1997). M13 = Evans, Coins from the Excavations at Sardis, 1973-2013 (2018). M14 = Petzl, Sardis: Greek and Latin Inscriptions, Part II (2019).

Select a site from the list below.

The stratigraphic contexts (findspots) of artifacts from Sardis are recorded at different levels of specificity. Sector is the most general, referring to a broad area of the city. Trenches are yearly excavation areas (in current usage) or more specific areas of sectors (in early records which used a different excavation system). A Locus is a single stratigraphic unit, i.e. a single deposit of soil, a destruction level, a grave, a dump or other deposit. For instance, MMS-I 84.1 Locus 34 is the destruction level from one room of a Lydian house just inside the fortification wall in sector MMS, containing a rich deposit of Lydian pottery and other artifacts. Note that loci can be continued over a number of years, and so belong to different trenches, if the same stratigraphic unit is excavated over a number of years. For a list of sectors see Hanfmann and Waldbaum, A Survey of Sardis and the Major Monuments Outside the City Walls (Sardis R1, 1975), 13-16. Currently (2020) in order to search for a specific locus, you must search for Trench first to narrow the results, and then search within that for the locus. Sorry.

The stratigraphic contexts (findspots) of artifacts from Sardis are recorded at different levels of specificity. Sector is the most general, referring to a broad area of the city. Trenches are yearly excavation areas (in current usage) or more specific areas of sectors (in early records which used a different excavation system). A Locus is a single stratigraphic unit, i.e. a single deposit of soil, a destruction level, a grave, a dump or other deposit. For instance, MMS-I 84.1 Locus 34 is the destruction level from one room of a Lydian house just inside the fortification wall in sector MMS, containing a rich deposit of Lydian pottery and other artifacts. Note that loci can be continued over a number of years, and so belong to different trenches, if the same stratigraphic unit is excavated over a number of years. For a list of sectors see Hanfmann and Waldbaum, A Survey of Sardis and the Major Monuments Outside the City Walls (Sardis R1, 1975), 13-16. Currently (2020) in order to search for a specific locus, you must search for Trench first to narrow the results, and then search within that for the locus. Sorry.

The stratigraphic contexts (findspots) of artifacts from Sardis are recorded at different levels of specificity. Sector is the most general, referring to a broad area of the city. Trenches are yearly excavation areas (in current usage) or more specific areas of sectors (in early records which used a different excavation system). A Locus is a single stratigraphic unit, i.e. a single deposit of soil, a destruction level, a grave, a dump or other deposit. For instance, MMS-I 84.1 Locus 34 is the destruction level from one room of a Lydian house just inside the fortification wall in sector MMS, containing a rich deposit of Lydian pottery and other artifacts. Note that loci can be continued over a number of years, and so belong to different trenches, if the same stratigraphic unit is excavated over a number of years. For a list of sectors see Hanfmann and Waldbaum, A Survey of Sardis and the Major Monuments Outside the City Walls (Sardis R1, 1975), 13-16. Currently (2020) in order to search for a specific locus, you must search for Trench first to narrow the results, and then search within that for the locus. Sorry.

Showing 8149 results for:  
  • Small bowl
    Small bowl

    LATW Cat. 201

    Pottery

    Ceramic

    Second half of the fifth century BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    Small echinoid black-slipped bowl. Vertical ring foot, rounded lip angled inward. Interior center stamped with circle surrounded by 13 carelessly stamped eggs/tongues and four palmettes. Intact, worn. Height 0.0214 m, diameter 0.0556 m.

  • Lekythos
    Lekythos

    LATW Cat. 202

    Pottery

    Ceramic

    Probably fifth century BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    Ovoid lekythos with flat, string-cut disc foot. Rim missing. Small knobs on each side of shoulder; between, handle scar. Unpainted. Preserved height 0.1378 m, diameter 0.0806 m.

  • Lekythos
    Lekythos

    LATW Cat. 203

    Pottery

    Ceramic

    Probably fifth century BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    Ovoid lekythos with flat, string-cut disc foot, tall body, broad outwardly thickened rim. Vertical oval handle going from neck to shoulder. Unpainted. Height 0.194 m, diameter 0.069 m.

  • Lekythos
    Lekythos

    LATW Cat. 204

    Pottery

    Ceramic

    Probably fifth century BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    Ovoid lekythos with flat, string-cut disc foot, tall body, broad outwardly thickened rim. Broken at neck. Scar of handle on shoulder. Unpainted. Preserved height 0.194 m, diameter 0.0718 m.

  • Alabaster alabastron
    Alabaster alabastron

    LATW Cat. 205

    Stone Vessel

    Alabaster, Stone

    Probably fifth century BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    Calcite (Egyptian alabaster) alabastron. Elongated ovoid body with round bottom; horizontal rim with rounded lip. Two small lug handles below rim. Mended from fragments, a few fragments missing. Fine lathe marks over interior and exterior surfaces. H...

  • Two figural linchpins
    Two figural linchpins

    LATW Cat. 206-207

    Metalwork

    Iron, Bronze/Copper Alloy

    Late sixth or early fifth century BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    Two linchpins from a pair of wheels, each consisting of a cast human torso with arms, attached to an iron pin. The figures wear the high, soft hats with tapering ends falling forward, commonly called Persian tiaras or Phrygian caps, and have their ar...

  • Two iron pins with rams’ heads
    Two iron pins with rams’ heads

    LATW Cat. 208-209

    Metalwork

    Iron, Bronze/Copper Alloy

    Late sixth or early fifth century BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    Two iron pins with decorative bronze rams’ heads. Flange at base of bronze head. Heads are triangular in shape, with horns curving behind ears.

  • Skull and right forearm from the skeleton of a young man
    Skull and right forearm from the skeleton of a young man

    LATW Cat. 210

    Miscellaneous

    Bone

    Ca. mid-sixth century BC (Lydian)

    Skull and right arm from the skeleton of a young man, probably a soldier who died in the Persian sack of Sardis. The skeleton was complete except for part of the pelvis; only selected parts are displayed here. It belonged to a young man, estimated to...

  • Iron helmet trimmed with bronze
    Iron helmet trimmed with bronze

    LATW Cat. 211

    Metalwork

    Iron, Bronze/Copper Alloy

    ca. 570-540s BC (Lydian)

    Fragments of a helmet including skull-piece with scalloped brow, two cheek-pieces (only the more complete exhibited), and neck guard, all once iron, now mostly corrosion products; trim consisting of bronze (and some iron) cords and multi-part bronze ...

  • Iron chopping sword
    Iron chopping sword

    LATW Cat. 212

    Metalwork

    Iron

    ca. 570-540s BC (Lydian)

    Blade and handle core unit, once iron, now corrosion products (iron oxide, magnetite, hematite on the exterior; limonite enveloped by magnetite on some interior parts); broken and repaired. The end of the handle core may be missing. The top side of b...

  • Iron sickle
    Iron sickle

    LATW Cat. 213

    Metalwork

    Iron

    Ca. 570-540s BC (Lydian)

    Iron. Adhering to the blade is part of an iron sieve or filter. Blade and “wrap-around” handle socket were made together. Preserved length 0.27 m, maximum width 0.035 m (blade length 0.22 m; handle socket length 0.05 m).

  • Seven arrowheads of bronze and iron
    Seven arrowheads of bronze and iron

    LATW Cat. 214

    Metalwork

    Iron, Bronze/Copper Alloy

    ca. 570-540s BC (Lydian)

    Bronze arrowheads have sockets and are leaf-shaped (some with high, others with tapering “shoulders”) and trilobate; iron arrowheads have tangs and are triangular and four-sided. Lengths vary between 0.034 m and 0.052 m.