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This area allows you to search for and learn about artifacts published by the Sardis Expedition. Currently (2017) the database consists of artifacts in the exhibition and catalog “The Lydians and Their World” (Yapı Kredi Vedat Nedim Tör Museum, Istanbul, 2010). In coming months we intend to add objects from all Sardis Reports and Monographs.

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Select an object type from the list below. Certain object types (including architectural terracottas, coins, pottery, sculpture) include subtypes (shape and ware of pottery, denomination and mint of coins) to refine your search.

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Select a Sardis CATNUM from the list below. CATNUM is made up from object type, year, and sequential number. BI = Bone Implement; G = Glass; J = Jewelry; L = Lamp; M = Metal; NoEx = not excavated; Org = Organic; P = Pottery; S = Sculpture. Coins are numbered with the year of discovery and a running number, or year, C, and a running number.

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The stratigraphic contexts (findspots) of artifacts from Sardis are recorded at different levels of specificity. Sector is the most general, referring to a broad area of the city. Trenches are yearly excavation areas (in current usage) or more specific areas of sectors (in early records which used a different excavation system). A Locus is a single stratigraphic unit, i.e. a single deposit of soil, a destruction level, a grave, a dump or other deposit. For instance, MMS-I 84.1 Locus 34 is the destruction level from a Lydian house just inside the fortification wall in sector MMS, containing a rich deposit of Lydian pottery and other artifacts. Note that loci can be continued over a number of years, and so belong to different trenches, if the same stratigraphic unit is excavated over a number of years. For a list of sectors see Hanfmann and Waldbaum, A Survey of Sardis and the Major Monuments Outside the City Walls (Sardis R1, 1975), 13-16.

The stratigraphic contexts (findspots) of artifacts from Sardis are recorded at different levels of specificity. Sector is the most general, referring to a broad area of the city. Trenches are yearly excavation areas (in current usage) or more specific areas of sectors (in early records which used a different excavation system). A Locus is a single stratigraphic unit, i.e. a single deposit of soil, a destruction level, a grave, a dump or other deposit. For instance, MMS-I 84.1 Locus 34 is the destruction level from a Lydian house just inside the fortification wall in sector MMS, containing a rich deposit of Lydian pottery and other artifacts. Note that loci can be continued over a number of years, and so belong to different trenches, if the same stratigraphic unit is excavated over a number of years. For a list of sectors see Hanfmann and Waldbaum, A Survey of Sardis and the Major Monuments Outside the City Walls (Sardis R1, 1975), 13-16.

The stratigraphic contexts (findspots) of artifacts from Sardis are recorded at different levels of specificity. Sector is the most general, referring to a broad area of the city. Trenches are yearly excavation areas (in current usage) or more specific areas of sectors (in early records which used a different excavation system). A Locus is a single stratigraphic unit, i.e. a single deposit of soil, a destruction level, a grave, a dump or other deposit. For instance, MMS-I 84.1 Locus 34 is the destruction level from a Lydian house just inside the fortification wall in sector MMS, containing a rich deposit of Lydian pottery and other artifacts. Note that loci can be continued over a number of years, and so belong to different trenches, if the same stratigraphic unit is excavated over a number of years. For a list of sectors see Hanfmann and Waldbaum, A Survey of Sardis and the Major Monuments Outside the City Walls (Sardis R1, 1975), 13-16.

Showing 33 results for:   Late Lydian (Persian) / Jewelry and Ornaments
  • Pyramidal stamp seal with gold mounting
    Pyramidal stamp seal with gold mounting

    Jewelry and Ornaments, Seal

    Gold, Stone

    (Late Lydian (Persian))

    “Chalcedony pyramidal stamp seal with gold mounting. The mounting is a gold strip terminating on either side with a carefully executed duck’s head with a long broad bill; the ducks’ eyes are shown, and the feathers on the backs of their heads are ...

  • Pyramidal stamp seal with silver mounting
    Pyramidal stamp seal with silver mounting

    Jewelry and Ornaments, Seal

    Silver, Stone

    (Late Lydian (Persian))

    Chalcedony pyramidal stamp seal, with silver mounting consisting of a flat band with simplified ducks’ bills holding the pin. A rounded silver band forms the suspension. The flat sealing surface is carved in intaglio, with a scene of heroic contro...

  • Pyramidal stamp seal with silver mounting
    Pyramidal stamp seal with silver mounting

    Jewelry and Ornaments, Seal

    Silver, Stone

    (Late Lydian (Persian))

    “Blue chalcedony pyramidal stamp seal, with a portion of a silver mounting consisting of a flat silver strip and the pin running through the stone. The flat sealing surface is carved in intaglio, with a winged, horned lion-griffin walking right on...

  • Pyramidal stamp seal with silver mounting
    Pyramidal stamp seal with silver mounting

    Jewelry and Ornaments, Seal

    Silver, Stone

    (Late Lydian (Persian))

    “Chalcedony pyramidal stamp seal, with corroded silver mounting consisting of a flat band with simplified ducks’ bills holding the pin. The sealing surface is carved in intaglio, with an open-mouthed lion-griffin walking right” (Dusinberre). Total...

  • Gold fabric appliqués and ornaments from Kendirlik
    Gold fabric appliqués and ornaments from Kendirlik

    Jewelry and Ornaments

    Gold

    (Late Lydian (Persian))

    Collection of gold ornaments and jewelry, belonging to one or more fabric items. According to Roosevelt (Roosevelt 2003, 632): “eight fragments probably belonging to...

  • Necklace with acorn pendants, from Toptepe
    Necklace with acorn pendants, from Toptepe

    Metalwork, Jewelry and Ornaments

    Gold, Stone, Glass

    Late sixth or early fifth century BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    The necklace is composed of twenty floral beads and eighteen plain beads with acorn pendents. Each floral bead is decorated with two six-petal rosettes that radiate from perforations at opposite ends of the bead and make contact at the petal tips....

  • Electrum necklace from Lydian Treasure
    Electrum necklace from Lydian Treasure

    Jewelry and Ornaments

    Electrum

    Late sixth or early fifth century BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    The necklace has been reconstructed from thirty beads of two kinds and seventeen pendants of two kinds. Twenty-six of the threaded beads are plain spheres, slightly indented around the perforations. They are made of sheet in two halves; the halves...

  • Pyramidal stamp seal pendant
    Pyramidal stamp seal pendant

    Jewelry and Ornaments, Seal

    Gold, Stone

    First half or middle of the sixth century BC (Meriçboyu) (Late Lydian (Persian))

    The device on the base of the stone shows a pair of single-horned Achaemenian winged griffins, seated and confronted with front paws, one raised, touching. The stone is horizontally perforated at the top, suspended on gold wire that is thick in th...

  • Agate pendant
    Agate pendant

    Jewelry and Ornaments

    Gold, Stone

    First half or middle of the sixth century BC (Meriçboyu) (Late Lydian (Persian))

    The agate, with pink, red, and white bands, is worked into a basically barrel-shaped bead that is flat at the bottom. It is perforated lengthwise and suspended on gold wire that is treated in a similar way to those of...

  • Gold brooch in form of six bow-coils
    Gold brooch in form of six bow-coils

    Metalwork, Jewelry and Ornaments

    Gold

    Late sixth or early fifth century BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    The brooch has an elongated composition of six bow-coils, arranged symmetrically, with two large bow-coils set back to back at the center and two at each end which form points. The bow-coils are outlined by granular beading, and there are two doub...

  • Pair of pomegranate-headed (beehive) pins
    Pair of pomegranate-headed (beehive) pins

    Metalwork, Jewelry and Ornaments

    Gold

    Late sixth or early fifth century BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    The two pins are virtually identical. The head has an abstracted pomegranate form, divided into six convex segments which are alternately plain and horizontally ribbed an separated by beaded wire. At the apex is a floret of six half-open petals on...

  • Pair of boat-shaped earrings
    Pair of boat-shaped earrings

    Jewelry and Ornaments

    Gold

    Late sixth or early fifth century BC (Late Lydian (Persian))

    The two boat-shaped earrings (sometimes called ‘leech-shaped’) are in the form of a crescent with pointed base and curved pointed corners, one corner tapering sharply into a long fine hook for passing through a pierced ear. Down the center at each...